Archive: Issue No. 132, August 2008

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CAPE TOWN

13.08.08 'Local Rhetorics' at Cape Africa Platform
13.08.08 'Experimental Frontiers' at Vansa
13.08.08 Bianca Baldi at blank projects
9.08.08 'Scratching the surface vol. 1' at AVA
9.08.08 Berni Searle at Michael Stevenson
9.08.08 'Monomania' at Goodman Gallery Cape
9.08.08 'Print 08' at Bell-Roberts
9.08.08 Youssef Nabil at Michael Stevenson
9.08.08 Rowan Smith at Whatiftheworld/Gallery
9.08.08 Warren Lewis at blank projects
9.08.08 'Avhashoni Mainganye, Charles Maggs and Zelda Weber at AVA
9.08.08 Cuny Janssen at João Ferreira
9.08.08 'Decade' at Sanlam Art Gallery
9.08.08 'Face 08' at 34Long
9.08.08 'Some South African Voices' at Rose Korber
9.08.08 Michaelis Fourth Years' 'Closing Down Sale' at The Centre for African Studies

6.07.08 Ângela Ferreira and Manthia Diawara at Michael Stevenson
6.07.08 Guy Tillim at Michael Stevenson
6.07.08 Nomusa Makhubu at Alliance Française

STELLENBOSCH

13.08.08 Kevin Brand at Sasol Art Museum
13.08.08 Rodin at the Rupert Museum
6.08.08 'Abstract South African Art from the Isolation Years: Volume II' at SMAC

PAARL

9.08.08 'This or Us' at Off the Wall

10.02.08 Andy Goldsworthy and Ouattara Watts at Glen Carlou

CAPE TOWN

Dan Halter

Dan Halter
Safe as Fuck
Aids ribbon, hypodermic needles, black foam-core
81 x 101cm


'Local Rhetorics' at Cape Africa Platform

'Local Rhetorics: Art about HIV/Aids from Addis Ababa and Cape Town' brings together work dealing with the pandemic by eight artists and is curated by Roman Yiseni along with the Cape Africa Platform Young Curators. By juxtaposing work from Cape Town and Addis Ababa, the show displays comparative perspectives on HIV and Aids. The show attempts to examine ways in which the visual arts address issues generally suppressed in presentations of the pandemic in the mainstream media.

Artists from different backgrounds, with diverse interests, present paintings, mixed-media drawings, installations, ceramics, fabrics and steel sculptures dealing with issues around HIV/Aids. These works deal with various issues from ambiguity over condom use, to musings on the disease as a societal game despite the devastating losses globally.

Participating artists include Dereje Tilahun, Demissie Gurmu, Elias Areda, Konjit Seyoum and Mulugeta Gebrekidan from Addis Ababa; and Dan Halter, Tashinga Matindike, Janet Ranson and John Bauer from Cape Town.

Opens: August 19
Closes: August 23


 


'Experimental Frontiers' at Vansa

'Experimental Frontiers' seeks to juxtapose Nigeria and South Africa through an artistic platform. Despite epochal positions occupied by these two countries in the African art scene, curators have never thought it expedient to bring these countries face to face under the banner of art. This exhibition is not only an important occasion to address the relationship between the two, but also a platform to compare the experimental motivations of a younger generation of artists from both countries.

Diderot notes two qualities essential for the artist: 'Is it socially relevant?' and 'Is it true?'. The exhibition seeks to apply these questions to the work of a contemporary generation. Curated by Okey Nwafor, exhibiting artists include Bright Eke, Amarachi Okafor, Ozioma Onuzulike, Chika Obeagu, Dan Halter, Stuart Bird and Ndidi Dike.

Opens: August 7
Closes: August 12


 

Bianca Baldi

Bianca Baldi


Bianca Baldi at Blank Projects

Bianca Baldi's new project plays with ideas of public affection, fantasy and the cinematic image - combining actors, Fiat Seicentos, complicity and hefty logistics to stage a Grand Romantic Gesture. This participatory project will develop with events during the month of September.

Opens: September 4
Closes: September 26


 

Sean Slemon

Sean Slemon
Joburg 1-11 2005


'Scratching the surface vol. 1' at AVA

'Scratching the Surface Vol.1' is curated by Gabi Ngcobo and Mwenya Kabwe and is the first curatorial initiative of manje-manje projects. Here, selected artists employ a play on the contemporary that is current and elusive. 'Manje' is an Nguni word meaning 'now'. The word has an urgency that becomes ambiguous once it is repeated. Thus, 'manje-manje', in relative terms, refers to the immediate past, the present as well as a time to come. Triggered by a desire to obliterate/reveal/satisfy/mark/damage, 'Scratching the Surface Vol. 1' facilitates the performance of Hip-Hop rituals, the mapping of skin conditions, repeated memory repeated, uncontrollably itchy feet and marks made by sound. The curatorial process becomes a loop of scratching, remembering, learning and erasing.

Performances by Mlu Zondi and Alude Mahali, Kate Streek and Penny Youngleson will take place at the opening at 6pm, as well as on Saturday August 9 and 16 from 11am - 1pm. A collaborative performance by Julian Jonker and Garth Erasmus will be presented on Saturday August only 16. On Friday August 8 Gugulective will launch 'Native Yard Memoirs' in Gugulethu, KwaMlamli, No. 15 NY 146, from 5pm till late.

Participating artists include Dineo Bopape, Gugulective, Bandile Gumbi, Julian Jonker and Garth Erasmus, Donna Kukama, Kemang Wa Lehulere, Simone Leigh, Thando Mama, Zanele Muholi, Kalinosi Mutale, Robin Rhode, Ruth Sacks, Sean Slemon, Alude Mahali, Katy Streek and Penny Youngleson, Ernestine White, and Mlu Zondi.

Opens: August 4
Closes: August 21


 

Berni Searle

Berni Searle
Alibama 2008
single-channel video DVD format, shot on HD digital video
Duration 6 mins 42 secs, sound


Berni Searle at Michael Stevenson

This will be Searle's fourth solo exhibition at Michael Stevenson, following 'Crush' in 2006, 'About to forget' in 2005, and 'Vapour' in 2004. As in all these previous shows, Searle's work draws on the particularities of her own cultural heritage, invoking the rituals and traditions that persist through generations and continue to bind communities together long after the circumstances of their genesis have passed or been forgotten. Yet the lyrical, abstracted nature of her visual imagery ensures that her work transcends the specific and extends to global themes such as belonging and displacement, nationalism and xenophobia.

Searle's latest video, Alibama, premiered at the Haunch of Venison gallery in London in May 2008 as part of the South African exhibition 'Home Lands - Land Marks'. It takes as its central motif the traditional and widely known Cape song, 'Daar Kom die Alibama', which is thought to refer to the sighting of the Confederate ship, the Alabama, in Table Bay in 1863. Footage of the sun setting over the harbour, accompanied by the singing of a Cape Malay choir, is disrupted as the camera pans over Robben Island and the noon gun fires its daily blast - powerful signifiers of time and place, both historical and contemporary. The film then shifts to a more intimate register, its soundtrack the artist teaching the song to her young son, who sings along until he falls asleep, while black streamers bleed colour into water surrounding a red paper boat.

Searle will also show other new work including Mute, where she responds emotively to the xenophobic violence wracking the country, and Spirit of '76, a work commissioned for an exhibition in Philadelphia in 2007 that, through its title, draws links between the signing of the US Declaration of Independence in 1776 and the Soweto Uprising in 1976.

Since her solo show here in 2006, Searle has had survey exhibitions at Johannesburg Art Gallery (2006) and the Contemporary Art Museum, University of South Florida (2006), travelling to the Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois (2007). She was one of three artists selected for the annual New Photography exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2007). Her work has featured on numerous group exhibitions in the past year, including 'Black Womanhood: Images, Icons, and Ideologies of the African Body' at the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, USA; 'Apartheid: The South African Mirror' at the Centre de Cultura Contemporania, Barcelona; and 'Global Feminisms' at the Brooklyn Museum, New York.

Opens: September 4
Closes: October 11


 

Siemon Allen

Siemon Allen
The Birds (detail)


Monomania at Goodman Gallery Cape

'Monomania' brings together works by Siemon Allen, Ryan Arenson, Joanne Bloch, David Koloane and Arie Kuijers who all work particularly intently with their chosen subject matter and materials. The act of collecting, ordering, archiving and repetition is an integral consideration in their practice. The term 'monomania' originated in the early 19th century, and is also referred to as idée fixe. Originally used to describe obsessive compulsive behaviour, more recently art historian and philosopher Marina van Zyulen revived the term to explore the curative and therapeutic attributes of single-minded, repetitive behaviours and practices of artists. These indefinitely repetitive actions also subvert expectations - instead of 'numbing down', a deepening and intensity of meaning occurs.

Koloane, a veteran of South African contemporary art, has repeatedly returned to the same subject matter: the streets of Johannesburg. In his large-scale drawings his mark-making reaches a heightened intensity, creating darkly enticing moodscapes.

Arenson is a previous winner of the Absa l'Atelier prize. Concerned with visual aesthetics and text, Arenson's work explores art historical references, which become signifiers for intensely personal experiences and histories. He creates meticulously layered surfaces, and works against an impulse to 'make pretty'. Paint blobs and drips obscure and reveal painstakingly applied details, creating tension and unease.

Allen, a South African artist based in the USA, presents The Birds, a large panel consisting of found 16mm film. Allen's practice is largely based on selective collecting of published material, which often accumulates for many years before being realized in large-scale installation. These archives are compiled by the artist through online auction sites, trawling second hand shops and specialist dealers.

Kuijers is an art historian and artist living and working in Bloemfontein. As a curator and archivist, he applies his trade to the obsessive collection and ordering of homo-erotica and gay pornography into complex installations and sculptures. Living and working in an extremely conservative social context, Kuijers' practice is at once subversive and secretive. In a practice largely hidden from mainstream town-life, he creates dense works that not only celebrate and critique queer lifestyles, but also reference the nature of and modes of display, museum practices and the exhibition industry.

Bloch is a collector of odd bits and bobs, plastic toys, pom-poms, shiny things - detritus of cheap factory produced stuff with minimal aesthetic or functional value. These are ordered into intricate tableaux and processions, where en-masse they become overwhelming and intriguing. Bloch is interested in the enormous material resources dedicated to the manufacture, distribution and consumption of these 'worthless' objects.

Opens: August 7
Closes: September 6


 

Sanell Aggenbach

Sanell Aggenbach
Playboys 2007
digital print
42 x 40cm


'Print 08' at Bell-Roberts

'Print 08: Myth, Memory and the Archive' surveys current developments in South African printmaking vis-‡-vis the archive and its dramatically expanded significance in the digital age. The exhibition, featuring some 30 established and emerging printmakers, explores the redefined notion of the archive as a result of the computer and new ethics and attitudes regarding images and objects. In conjunction with the exhibition, a day of public discussions addressing the contemporary positioning of print will be presented at Bell-Roberts Gallery on August 15 in collaboration with the Michaelis School of Fine Art and the Visual Arts Department, Stellenbosch. Other complementary events include the on-site printing of a print-portfolio.

The Friends of the National Gallery will be hosting a walkabout with Fritha Langerman on August 21 at 11am. The cost is R20.

Opens: August 13
Closes: September 19


 

Rowan Smith

Rowan Smith
Extensions of the Universe


Rowan Smith at Whatiftheworld / Gallery

In the press release for the show, Linda Stupart explains: 'With one small step from Mr. Neil Armstrong we reached a world that had seemed to reside outside of the reach of human experience. Yet, almost half a century later, the romantic longing for large-scale space travel, residence and communication with some yet unknown extraterrestrial force remains. This desire, a continual and unfocussed looking outwards, is linked both to the nostalgia born of our millennial uncertainty, and a looking forward to The Future, a vision simultaneously of apocalyptic dystopia and magical technological efficiencies and entertainments... How do we posit any individual identity when we know ourselves to be merely a speck of dust in the cosmos?'

All of these are the questions that Smith posits in this, his first solo offering, hosted by Whatiftheworld / Gallery. Using the language of outdated retro-cool technology and handcrafted sculptures, Smith presents a series of works that subtly, sadly investigate a nostalgia for the future and an insatiable and unanswerable lust for something outside of our everyday experience. Smith graduated from Michaelis last year, winning the annual prize for excellence. He recently wowed audiences at the Joburg Art fair with his undergraduate work, which spans media from pysical computing to meticulously crafted objects.

Opens: August 5
Closes: August 30


 

Warren Lewis

Warren Lewis
Telling Fibs


Warren Lewis at blank projects

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Opens: August 6
Closes: August 30


 

Youssef Nabil

Youssef Nabil
Rania, Cairo 2002
hand-coloured silver gelatin print
40 x 27cm


Youssef Nabil at Michael Stevenson

This is Youssef Nabil's second showing at Michael Stevenson, following 'Sleep in My Arms' in 2007. The exhibition will bring together hand-coloured photographs of celebrities and friends, self-portraits, and scenes staged over the past 15 years. Nabil was born in 1972 in Cairo where he studied literature and began producing his photographs while still living there. In this time he took many glamorous portraits of singers and stars such as Natacha Atlas, Naguib Mahfouz, Youssra and legendary belly-dancer Fifi Abdou. He later moved to Paris and New York, where he has continued to produce haunting self-portraits that reflect his dislocated life away from Egypt, as well as portraits of fellow artists, many of them from the Arab world, including Ghada Amer, Shirin Neshat, Mona Hatoum, Tracey Emin and Zaha Hadid.

In his photographs, his preoccupations with fame, sex, loneliness and death are immediately apparent. Many of the famous sitters are photographed asleep, in the realms of dreams and rest, far from their public personae. Or Nabil photographs them in a glamorous manner befitting their fame, often set against a pale blue background, his gentle hand-colouring removing the blemishes of reality. In his staged photographs he creates scenes that recall Arabic cinema of the 1950s where the heroes and stars act out the broken dreams of love, life and sex. Interspersed throughout the series are self-portraits in liminal spaces on the edge of consciousness where he is seemingly unaware of the presence of the camera.

Nabil's first collection of photographs was published by Autograph ABP, London, and Michael Stevenson in 2007. He was awarded the Seydou Keita Prize for portraiture at the 2003 Biennial of African Photography in Bamako, Mali. He has previous had solo exhibitions at the Rencontres Internationales de la Photographie in Arles, France, in 2003; the Centro de la Imagen, Mexico City, in 2001; and the Third Line Gallery in Dubai in 2007. His work has featured on numerous curated exhibitions including, in 2008, 'Far from Home' at the North Carolina Museum of Art; and, in 2006, 'Arabiske Blikke' at the GL Strand Museum in Copenhagen; 'Word into Art' at the British Museum, London; and 'Nineteen Views: Contemporary Arab Photography' at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporõneo, Seville, Spain.

Opens: September 4
Closes: October 11


 

Charles Maggs

Charles Maggs
Protection
still from video


Avhashoni Mainganye, Charles Maggs and Zelda Weber at AVA

Avhashoni Mainganye presents 'Journey' in the main gallery. Mainganye works as a photographer, painter, printmaker and sculptor. He studied at Rorke's Drift and after completing his course, returned to Venda where he helped establish the Venda Art Foundation, forerunner of Ditike, an organisation dedicated to assisting rural artists market their work. A previous participant in Thupelo workshops, he was awarded the Solly Weiner Bursary at UNISA in 1985 and was a finalist in the 2008 Sasol wax awards.

Charles Maggs completed his Master's in Fine Art at Michaelis in 2006 with distinction. Currently a senior Lecturer at AAA, Maggs exhibits 'Zombie' in the Long gallery. The title of the exhibtion comes from lyrics by Fela Kuti:
'Zombie no go go, unless you tell am to go (Zombie)
Zombie no go stop, unless you tell am to stop (Zombie)
Zombie no go turn, unless you tell am to turn (Zombie)
Zombie no go think, unless you tell am to think (Zombie)'

'Zombie' is a photographic and new media-based exhibition that negotiates fear and prejudice. Maggs distorts everyday media images rendering them in equal parts banal and horrific. 'Zombie' becomes a reflection of humanity, enmeshed in the 24 hour media machine.

The third component of the AVA's offering is work from Zelda Weber, a part-time lecturer at Ruth Prowse entitled 'Cut to Size'. Weber has created a series of etchings that explores stages of psychological and emotional human development.

Opens: August 25
Closes: September 12


 

Cuny Janssen

Cuny Janssen
Prince Albert, Karoo, South Africa, 2005
c-print
67 x 79cm


Cuny Janssen at João Ferreira

Using photography as a tool to understand the world in which she lives, Cuny Janssen continued her explorations in her recent exhibition 'There is Something in the Air in Prince Albert'. As Janssen explains 'Never before I was at a place where so much was still visible and sensible of the pre-history. When walking through the landscape I could easily image dinosaurs. As far as my eyes could see there wasn't a single person or animal. But I felt that I wasn't alone. There was something in the air! It was the area where 200 000 years ago one of the first humans lived. In the thousands of years that followed, they spread into world.'

Janssen states 'with the results of my photographical activities in Prince Albert I hope to confirm life itself, its complexity, its pleasure and especially its beauty'.

Opens: August 6
Closes: August 30


 

Gavin Younge

Gavin Younge
Forces Favourites
bicycle and video installation


'Decade' at Sanlam Art Gallery

In celebrating the 90th anniversary of the founding of the Sanlam in 1918, the Sanlam Art Collection is presenting an exhibition highlighting the last ten years of acquisitions. Since 1997 Sanlam has added some 544 works by South African artists to its collection begun in 1965.

In keeping with the objective of compiling a representative collection of South African art, the exhibition of 83 works from the late 19th century to the present is a an eclectic mixture of past and present. As curator of the Collection, Stefan Hundt states: 'The exhibition attempts within in the limitations of the space available to present some of the most interesting works acquired over the last ten years. In the context of considerable demand for works by famous "Old Masters" on one hand and cutting-edge contemporary works on the other, some of the artists represented on this exhibition have almost been forgotten. I hope that to some degree this exhibition will re-introduce art lovers to the rich diversity that has made up South African art over the last century.'

Works on display range from a Frans Oerder watercolour (1899) depicting an interior to a 1970s watercolour of a view of Hout Bay by Durant Sihlali; and a beautiful almost surrealist landscape by Ricky Dyaloyi; sculptures by Johannes Maswanganyi, Edoardo Villa and Philipps Kolbe, to the gritty installations of Jan van der Merwe, Gavin Younge and Leora Faber.

Opens: August 7
Closes: January 16, 2009


 

Asha Zero

Asha Zero
Mini decoy #7 2008
acrylic on board
27.5 x 17.5 cm


'Face 08' at 34Long

'Face 08' is an exhibition of portraits that includes new work from Asha Zero, a 2004 lithograph from Marlene Dumas, as well as representatives from Japan and China. The latter includes eight portraits in the Manga tradition by Hiroyuki Matsuura, a rising pop artist from Japan, a 2001 silkscreen by Yue Minjun, one of the world's highest-priced artists, and an acrylic painting by Zhang Dali, entitled AK-47, from a series of portraits of Chinese migrant workers. Zhang's work has not been shown in Africa before.

Opens: August 12
Closes: September 6


 

Sam Nhlengethwa

Sam Nhlengethwa
Jazz Trio 1 2001
oil and collage on paper


'Some South African Voices' at Rose Korber

Eight contemporary South African artists are featured in this exhibition, and Korber points out that despite the fact that there is no particular theme linking the works of these artists, nor is there a common style or medium that unites them, their works, in one way or another, emphasise their deep South African roots and commitment.

Included are Willie Bester, Paul du Toit, Zwelethu Mthethwa, Sam Nhlengethwa, Selwin Pekeur, Sophie Peters, ceramicist Yvette McGee and the Makhubele family, renowned for their fine examples of contemporary Tsonga-Shangaan beadwork. The variety of works to be seen here is proof of how dynamic and innovative the contemporary South African art scene has become.

'The new democratic circumstances of the mid 1990's,' writes art consultant, Gilfillan Scott-Berning, 'have allowed South Africans to acknowledge an individuality and to provide a new energy on a new stage, as it is not only the social, political and economic issues of apartheid that define us... The cultural isolation of the apartheid years has given way to the reality of social change and the real challenges and economics of everyday life'.

Opens: August 4
Closes: mid-September


 

Lauren Fletcher

Lauren Fletcher
Untitled (Vidi Vici Veni) 2008
digital print


Michaelis Fourth Years' 'Closing Down Sale' at The Centre for African Studies

Over the past year, the Michaelis Fourth years have engaged in a series of debauched fundraising activities, providing world-class entertainment and cheap booze at Early Friday. Now, in a desperate attempt to make some cash for their catalogue, they present 'Closing Down Sale: Everything Must Go', a silent auction in which the soon-to-be-graduates will flog their wares at bargain prices. An uncurated show, it nevertheless promises to throw up all kinds of curatorial coincidences, and a lot of cheap wine. The Fourth years invite you to come, bring your cash and take advantage of this opportunity to get your hands on hot, cheap art at all-time low prices. Bidding starts from as little as R250 for 4th year work, and R1000 for Master's students' work.

Opens: 6pm, August 18
Closes: August 23


 

Tanya Poole

Manthia Diawara
Maison Tropicale 2007
film still


Ângela Ferreira and Manthia Diawara at Michael Stevenson

Ângela Ferreira's new work is accompanied by the first screening in Africa of Maison Tropicale by Manthia Diawara, commissioned on the occasion of Ferreira's participation in the 2007 Venice Biennale. Ferreira's work, For Mozambique (model no. 2 for a screen-orator-kiosk celebrating the post-independence utopia), 2008, is based on a 1922 design for an agitprop kiosk by the Russian Constructivist Gustav Klucis. The structure, with its reference to the political optimism following the Russian revolution in the 1920s, is surmounted by a screen on which Ferreira presents two films that in turn reflect the euphoria surrounding Mozambique's independence from colonial rule in the mid-1970s.

Born in 1958 in Maputo, Mozambique, Ferreira grew up in South Africa and obtained her MFA from Michaelis. She lives and works in Lisbon, and was chosen to represent Portugal at the 52nd Venice Biennale in 2007. For her Venice work, Maison Tropicale, Ferreira continued her investigations into the ways in which European modernism adapted, or failed to adapt, to the realities of the African continent by tracing the history of Jean Prouve's Maison Tropicale or 'tropical house'.

The making of Ferreira's Maison Tropicale is the subject of a film by Diawara, which follows the artist's visits to the sites where the prototypes of the houses were installed in Brazzaville in the Republic of the Congo and Niamey in Niger, as well as the subsequent 'reclamation' of the prototypes by the Western art world. The 58-minute film will be screened at the gallery throughout the run of the exhibition.

Diawara, who was born in Mali, is Professor of Comparative Literature and Film, and Director of the Institute of African-American Affairs at New York University. He has published several books on black culture, film and literature including African Cinema: Politics and Culture (1992) and We Won't Budge (2003). His films include Bamako Sigi Kan (2001) and Conakry Kas (2004).

Opens: July 10
Closes: August 23


 

Guy Tillim

Guy Tillim
Grande Hotel, Beira, Mozambique, 2008
archival pigment ink on cotton rag paper


Guy Tillim at Michael Stevenson

Guy Tillim's new body of work reflects on the civic architecture conceived in the idealism of the last years of colonialism and the immediate post-colonial period in Africa. In the French and Portuguese colonies, in particular, modernist architecture was used expressly to convey the ideology of the era. The utopian colonial vision was flawed, and the structures were a strange and fragile hybrid of aspirations and ideas that were not necessarily applicable to Africa. However, through subsequent shifts in power, this architecture has been absorbed into an indisputably African reality, and today these buildings and civic spaces are an integral component of contemporary African culture.

Tillim, in his photography, resists focusing on the formalism of the architecture and instead considers its changing use of over the past half-century. He also resists viewing the buildings reductively as symbols of domination or as representative of the general decay of African institutions, but rather seeks to acknowledge the complexity of their histories.

Tillim embarked on this project as the recipient of the first Robert Gardner Fellowship in Photography granted by the Peabody Museum at Harvard University in the United States. In 2008 Tillim has solo exhibitions at Haunch of Venison in Zurich and Haus für Kunst in Altdorf, Switzerland, and is included on Biennale Cuvée at the OK Centre for Contemporary Art in Linz, Austria. He also takes part in the Hereford Photography Festival - Contemporary Photography from South Africa Part 2 - in the UK; and 'Presumed Innocence: Photographic Perspectives of Children' at DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Massachusetts, USA.

Opens: July 10
Closes: August 23


 

Nomusa Makhubu

Nomusa Makhubu


Nomusa Makhubu at Alliance Française

'Iso Eliphandliwe' is a photographic exhibition by Nomusa Makhubu. Makhubu explains: 'It will be comprised of images that disfigure the self-portrait while trying to re-place it to an identifiable axis. There is usage of old (South) African photography. My self-portrait becomes lost within images that have centred debates about the black female body within constructs of culture and socialisation.' Makhubu received the 2006 Gerard Sekoto Award for the year's most promising young artist. This award was initiated in collaboration with Absa, the French Embassy, the French Institute of South Africa (IFAS) and the Alliance Française.

Opens: July 5
Closes: August 29


 
 
STELLENBOSCH

Kevin Brand

Kevin Brand


Kevin Brand at Sasol Art Museum

After a successful showing in Pretoria, the works of winner Kevin Brand and fellow nominees for the 2008 Mercedes-Benz South Africa Award for Art Projects in Public Spaces comes to Stellenbosch. Brand scooped the 2008 Award earlier this year. Brand's work is distinguished by his use of non-traditional sculptural materials to make strong but increasingly nuanced comments on aspects of South African social history and life. His particular interest is to make work that is accessible to the larger community, and locate it in a public arena.

In their judging of the 2008 Arts Award, the jury panel said that Brand was named winner, because his engagement with historical events is both personal and political. 'In referencing historical events, Brand is able through materiality, scale and process to capture public imagination - for example, in the "Fault Lines" Exhibition at the Cape Town Castle where he recreated on a wall Sam Nzima's iconic image of Hector Pieterson. Working outside of convention, Brand's production is brave and is not restricted to rules and boundaries that often come with commissions,' said jury member Bongi Matlau, on behalf of the adjudication panel.

Brand won a cash prize and, together with the other seven finalists, has exhibited his work in Pretoria, and now in Stellenbosch. Later this year the exhibition will move to Berlin. A catalogue has been published featuring the eight finalists and showcasing their work, with the largest section dedicated to Brand. Other nominees are Marco Cianfanelli, Jane du Rand, Strijdom van der Merwe, Vincent Baloyi, Jan Jordaan and Usha Seejarim.

Opens: August 6


 

Auguste Rodin

Auguste Rodin
The Kiss


Rodin at the Rupert Museum

South Africans will have the rare opportunity to view 26 bronze sculptures by legendary French sculptor, Auguste Rodin. The bronzes will be exhibited at the Rupert Museum in Stellenbosch and include famous works such as The Thinker, The Kiss and The Cathedral. At the height of his career, Rodin was regarded as the greatest sculptor since Michelangelo. Straying from 19th Century academic conventions, Rodin created his own sense of personal artistic expression that focused on the vitality of the human spirit. His modelling techniques captured the movement and depth of emotion of his subjects by altering traditional poses and gestures. His pioneering work has been a critical link between traditional and modern figurative sculpture.

Rodin had a profound influence on 20th Century sculpture. He refused to ignore the negative aspects of humanity, and his works confront distress and moral weakness as well as passion and beauty.

Opens: August 21


 

Fred Schimmel

Fred Schimmel
Untitled 1978


'Abstract South African Art from the Isolation Years: Volume II' at SMAC

'Abstract South African Art from the Isolation Years: Volume II' is the second in a series of exhibitions to focus exclusively on the generation of post-war avant-garde artists who consciously embraced the modernist idiom and produced art of an abstract or non-figurative nature during the 60s, 70s and 80s.

The history of abstract art in South Africa is diverse and complex, comprising various influences that cannot be reduced to a single linear and chronological narrative. The exhibition has therefore been curated in an inclusive manner to represent a unique body of work which highlights the different styles and exponents that made a significant contribution to the abstract movement in South Africa.

Some of the artists included in this year's collection are Lionel Abrahams, Bill Ainslie, Kenneth Bakker, Charl Buchner, Walter Battis, Bettie Cilliers-Barnard, Joan Claire, Christo Coetzee, Nel Erasmus, Barbara Burry, George Boys, Nils Burwitz, Charles Gassner, Cecil Higgs, Erik Loubscher, Dumisani Mabaso, Louis Maqhubela, Dirk Meerkotter, Georgina Ormiston, Douglas Portway, Fred Schimmel, Larry Scully, Cecily Sash, Henry Symonds, Gunter van Der Reis Edoardo Villa, Gordon Vorster and Anna Vorster. Also forming part of this exhibition is a unique collection of Ernest Mancoba's early paintings from Kattinge, Denmark.

Opens: June 19
Closes: August 29


 
 
PAARL


'This or Us' at Off the Wall Contemporary

Participants in 'This or Us', Dylan Graham, Cobus Haupt and Sarel Petrus explain their motivation for the exhibition: 'Artworks are synonyms for difficult to explain human conditions. Rather than going into long, serious, open ended discussions about human experience, we create concrete objects in a traditional western art language. Paintings and sculptures are used to indicate work processes in the abstract collective conscious of human society. As the "or" in the title suggests, there is always at least one alternative to what is in front of you, or your viewpoint thereof, and these artworks are substitutible with our, and your, ideas on life.'

Opens: August 7
Closes: September 7


 

Ouattara Watts and Andy Goldsworthy

Ouattara Watts and Andy Goldsworthy
installation view

Ouattara Watts

Ouattara Watts
Creation of the world 2002
mixed media on canvas, photography, wood, copper
280 x 400 cm


Andy Goldsworthy and Ouattara Watts at Glen Carlou

Land artist Andy Goldsworthy has travelled to South Africa to oversee the installation of three of his pieces into the collection of the Swiss magnate Donald Hess, owner of Paarl winery Glen Carlou. Goldsworthy is a world famous environmental sculptor who explores and experiments with various natural materials such as leaves, stones, wood, sand, clay, ice and snow. The seasons and weather determine the materials and the subject matter of his projects. With no preconceived ideas of what he will create, he relies on what nature gives him. One piece Hard Earth was originally created by plastering the inside of a room with white clay which as it dried and cracked began to take on a vastly differently aspect. Hard Earth and other Goldsworthy pieces in the Hess collection will be going on show.

Alongside Goldsworthy, a key diasporan artist, Ouattara Watts, will also be showing work at Glen Carlou. Watts has been featured in a number of blockbuster shows including Okwui Enwenzor's 'The Short Century', 'Documenta' in 2000, the Whitney biennale and the Venice biennale. On display will be 11 of his paintings and watercolours from 1992 until 2006.

Opens: January 29


 
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