Archive: Issue No. 107, July 2006

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DURBAN

7.07.06 'Studio 8' at artSPACE durban
7.07.06 Malibongwe Shangase at the BAT Centre
7.07.06 Philemon Shangwe at the African Art Centre
7.07.06 'FNB Craft Now' at the KZNSA Gallery
7.07.06 A Retrospective by Omar Badsha at the Durban Art Gallery

2.06.06 Peter Magubane at the Durban Art Gallery
2.06.06 'Ubuntu - Striving for Life and Peace' at the Durban Art Gallery
2.06.06 'Visual Trajectories - Art from India' at the Durban Art Gallery
2.06.06 'Start: The Nivea Art Awards' at the KZNSA
2.06.06 'Five Artists/ Five Directions' at the KZNSA
2.06.06 'Portrait of a Pioneer: Joseph Forsyth-Ingram' at the Tatham Art Gallery
2.06.06 'Treasures from the Dungeon: R.H. Whitwell Collection' at the Tatham Art Gallery

5.05.06 'The Indian in Drum in the 1950s' at the Durban Art Gallery
 

DURBAN

Leanne Boulter

Leanne Boulter
oil on canvas
100 x 100cm

Francois van Reenen

Francois van Reenen
mixed media sculptures

Tracey Lee Lynch

Tracey Lee Lynch
Boy and Girl
mixed media on canvas
120 x 70cm
 


'Studio 8' at artSPACE durban

'Studio 8' is a collaborative exhibition by Cape Town-based artists Leanne Boulter, Francois van Reenen and Tracey Lee Lynch, who all share a studio space.

Boulter's paintings deal with the social issues of HIV/Aids, family violence and family murders, focusing in particular on the effect these have on women and children. She aims to honour the innocent victims of these social scourges and in a quiet way, elevate them to iconic status. Van Reenen most recently showed at JHB's Premises Gallery, following his show at Cape Town's Erdmann Contemporary. He was also a recent ABSA L'Atelier Award finalist. Van Reenen takes his inspiration from popular culture, working in sculpture, painting and computer-generated printed imagery and animation.

Since the completion of her studies, Tracey Lee Lynch has worked as a full-time artist, exhibiting in Cape Town and Johannesburg as well as in London. Her talent has been called on for many commissions around the world.

Opens: July 5
Closes: July 22



Malibongwe Shangase at the BAT Centre

In an exhibition titled 'UkuFunda' (learning), Malibongwe Shangase explores his study of woodcut prints under the mentorship of Ezequel Mabote. Shangase is an ex-BAT Centre student from the Artist-in-Residency programme. He graduated in 2004 and is now a resident artist at the Centre's studios.

Opens: July 18
Closes: August 4


Philmon Sangweni

Philemon Sangweni in his studio

Philmon Sangweni

Philemon Sangweni with his son
 


Philemon Sangweni at the African Art Centre

The African Art Centre will be showcasing an exhibition of work by Philemon Sangweni, who has been named as the African Art Centre's 'Artist of the Year 2006'. Criteria for the award include mature age, consistent production over a number of years, innovation, vision, contribution to art or craft and the passing on of skills and knowledge to their community.

Sangweni sculpts using indigenous woods which he finds in the forests near to where he lives in northern KwaZulu-Natal. He has been carving since the 1970's and was originally encouraged by Jo Thorpe of the African Art Centre. His work is represented in the Durban Art Gallery's collection. The award has been sponsored by the National Arts Council.

Opens: July 19
Closes: August 12



'FNB Craft Now' at the KZNSA Gallery

In an attempt to showcase the best craft in the country, the Craft Council of South Africa together with their partners FNB, are travelling this year's 'FNB Craft Now' exhibition to Durban where it will be hosted by the KZNSA Gallery. The competition awards R15 000, R10 000 and R6 000 for 1st, 2nd and 3rd prizes. This year the Craft Council has established a new category called the 'New Signature Prize', to the value of R5 000.

The Craft Council has selected exciting, innovative work, reflecting a diverse celebration of craft. Many of the products make reference to South African culture, environment or social structure. Following the exhibition, the top 20 selected works will be an auctioned at the Park Hyatt Hotel in Rosebank.

Opens: July 20
Closes: August 13


Omar Badsha

Omar Badsha
Pensioner, Transkei
black and white photograph

Omar Badsha

Omar Badsha
Teacher with Class, Inanda
black and white photograph
 


A Retrospective by Omar Badsha at the Durban Art Gallery

The Durban Art Gallery is hosting the first major retrospective exhibition of the work of Durban-born artist and photographer Omar Basha. The show will include drawings and photographs that span his artistic career over a period of 41 years. Badsha is one of the first group of artists who not only overtly challenged the apartheid regime but who is credited, along with Dumile Feni, for creating a new visual vocabulary that questioned the one dimensional representation of black life in South Africa.

'From the Margins to the Centre' covers examples of work from all of Badsha's publications from his first book A letter to Farzanah through to Imijondolo life in Inanda, Imperial Ghetto and Road to Tadkeshwar.

Badsha has received a number of awards for painting and photography including the Sir Basil Shornland Award, Arts South Africa Today 1965, The Sir Ernest Oppenheimer Memorial Award, Natal Society Of Arts - Annual award 1968. In 1995 he was commissioned by the Danish Government to document life in that country and in 1996 he travelled to India as a guest of the Indian Government to document life in his grandparents' ancestral village in Gujarat.

Badsha and his family moved to Cape Town in 1987 where he established the Centre of Documentary Photography at the University of Cape Town. Aside from numerous group shows worldwide, Badsha has held several solo shows in South Africa. His paintings and photographs are to be found in all the major public collections in South Africa and leading galleries and institutions abroad. He is also the founder and director of 'South African History Online', one of the largest websites on South Africa history and culture.

Opens: July 26
Closes: September 3



Peter Magubane at the Durban Art Gallery

'Madiba Man of Destiny', an exhibition of photographs by renowned photographer Dr. Peter Magubane, will coincide with 'Striving together for Life and Peace' the 16th World Council of YMCAs in Durban.

This exhibition captures the life of Nelson Mandela, encapsulating a man who has played a critical role in the establishment of a democratic South Africa. It captures moments in history that give the viewer a glimpse of Madiba as a man of destiny, interacting with ordinary citizens, his family, high profile political figures and also features significant political events. Different events reflecting the history of South Africa and experiences of South Africans during and after the apartheid era are featured and the exhibition reads like a narrative revealing the oppression, the struggle and victory of all South Africans reflected through the life of Madiba.

This exhibition was curated by the Roodeport Museum and began its tour at the Orlando East Community Hall in Soweto as part of the events that marked the conferment of Freedom of the City of Johannesburg to Madiba in July 2004.

Opens: June 14
Closes: July 30



'Ubuntu - Striving for Life and Peace' at the Durban Art Gallery

In tandem with 'Madiba Man of Destiny', the Durban Art Gallery presents a cameo exhibition titled 'Ubuntu - Striving for Life and Peace'. Some of the artists on exhibition include Thami Mnyele, Eric Mbatha, Mzwakhe Jacob Nhlabati, Mpolokeng Raymond Ramphomane and Vincent Baloyi.

'Ubuntu - Striving together for Life and Peace' is the conference theme of the 16th World Council of YMCA's meeting in Durban in July. Notions of ubuntu are enshrined in the Zulu maxim 'umuntu ngumuntu ngabantu' or 'a person is a person through (other) persons'. During the 1970s and 1980s the YMCAs were locations of convergence and synergy in the art-centre networks of South African artists.

The YMCA's key principles of striving for the spiritual, intellectual and physical well being of individuals, as well as wholeness of communities, served to strengthen the artist's sense of personal and communal development in a racially unjust South Africa. One such artist was Thami Mnyele who shunned the mainstream gallery system and showed his work at the Dube YMCA, Soweto, in September 1977 on an exhibition titled 'A New Day'. Mnyele was an artist activist who died in the cross-border raid on Gaberone in 1985.

Opens: June 14
Closes: July 30


Gupta Subodh

Gupta Subodh
Three Cows
oil on canvas
167 x 230cm

Bhupen Khakkar

Bhupen Khakkar
Man with a Bouquet of Plastic Flowers
oil on Canvas
140 x 145cm

Nalini Malani

Nalini Malani
Untitled
oil on acrylic sheet
173 x 164cm
 


'Visual Trajectories - Art from India' at the Durban Art Gallery

This exhibition is a manifestation of the agreement on cultural cooperation between the governments of the Republic of South Africa and India, with Iziko South African National Gallery (SANG) and the National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA) in New Delhi as nodal agencies. The exhibition, curated from the permanent collection of the NGMA will be shown in Cape Town, Pretoria and Durban in 2006 and an exhibition from the Iziko SANG collection, curated by Hayden Proud, will travel to three cities in India from 2007. The intention of this exchange is to create a deeper understanding of our histories and our art. Says director of the NGMA, Rajeev Lochan: 'The confluence of tradition and personal aspects of representation intermingle intelligently in the exhibition 'Visual Trajectories' to produce a unique and distinctive pictorial language that documents and marks the evolution of visual arts in India during the last 150 years, through the works of some of the most outstanding artists of that period. Opening with the confluence of British Indian Art and the prevailing taste, reflecting a past that both India and South Africa have shared, the exhibition also accords due notice to the unknown Indian artists of the 19th century.'

This exhibition documents some of the leading schools of thought since the early 20th century. Beginning with the Bengal school's fascination with Indian history and myth, it traces broadly the leading engagements of Indian art, as well as the quest for modernism and use of an abstract language in the 1960s and 70s. The exhibition presents the artist's adaptation to abstraction with distinct western and Indian elements. 'Visual Trajectories' also highlights some of the contentious issues that art has raised or sought to resolve in the contemporary period.

Opens: June 21
Closes: July 23



'Start: The Nivea Art Awards' at the KZNSA

In a collaboration that seeks to create a platform for development in the field of visual art here in KwaZulu-Natal, the KZNSA Gallery together with their partners Biersdorf present 'Start: The Nivea Art Awards'.

In its second year 'Start' selected 20 finalists from a pool of entries solicited from all over KwaZulu-Natal. These 20 were commissioned to produce work that will go on display at the KZNSA Gallery for judging.

The competition awards three prizes annually, the first prize being R20 000, the second R10 000 and the third R5 000. The commissioned artists worked closely with the judges and were required to submit three progress reports before presenting the final artwork. This year's judges include Sfiso KaMkame, Storm Janse van Rensburg, Juliet Armstrong, Anthea Martin, Gabi Nkosi and Nathi Gumede.

Opens: June 27
Closes: July 16



'Five Artists/ Five Directions' at the KZNSA

Five artists rooted in mutual respect for each other's work have put together an exhibition titled: 'Five Artists/ Five Directions'. All five lecture at the Centre for Visual Art at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg. Vulindlela Nyoni, Michelle Stewart, Ian Calder, Juliet Armstrong and Terence King embarked on a journey that will bring the biggest group exhibition to come out of Pietermaritzburg in many years.

King's work comprises a suite of six figurative paintings. These are principally torsos placed frontally against designed domestic objects or alongside ancient wall markings. Juliet Armstrong teaches ceramics and has specialised in the making of high fired bone china. She is interested in the delicate translucency when the forms she makes are shown against a strong light. Her sculptures are based on Zulu pregnancy aprons or isibodiya worn by women in the rural areas to protect their unborn child.

Vulindlela Nyoni teaches printmaking and his work explores various emotions and experiences that relate to a latent sense of mortality in human behaviour. Michelle Stewart lectures in painting and animation and in her work explores figurative representations of power and identity.

Ian Calder's painted and sculpted ceramic vessels reflect his thoughts on life and identity within the locale of KwaZulu-Natal.

Opens: June 27
Closes: July 16


Joseph Forsyth Ingam

Joseph Forsyth Ingram in his Studio

Joseph Forsyth Ingam

Joseph Forsyth Ingram exhibition poster
 


'Portrait of a Pioneer: Joseph Forsyth-Ingram' at the Tatham Art Gallery

The Tatham Art Gallery is hosting an exhibition of works by Joseph Forsyth Ingram (1862 - 1923). The exhibition comprises five paintings by Ingram completed between 1910 and 1923. Also included in the exhibition will be examples of Ingram's poetry, books, decorated letters and envelopes and Christmas albums.

Forsyth-Ingram was a Magistrate in Dundee, Howick and Pietermaritzburg while remaining a prolific artist and writer. This exhibition features a number of his paintings as well as archival and biographical material that would be of great interest to the residents of Pietermaritzburg. A number of the works on exhibition are being donated by Forsyth-Ingram's descendants to the Tatham Art Gallery.

Opens: May 4
Closes: This exhibition has been extended until the renovations for the new Gallery Craft Shop commence



'Treasures from the Dungeon: R.H. Whitwell Collection' at the Tatham Art Gallery

The 'Treasures from the Dungeon' exhibition was on display during December, but due to public demand has been extended.

The exhibition unearths a number of works donated by Colonel R.H. Whitwell between 1923 and 1926. Whitwell's donation comprised of over 400 works that are mainly by British and French artists. Included are works by Charles Isaac Ginner, Charles Maurice, Edward Julius Detmold, Edward Frank Giller, George du Maurier, Sir Frank Brangwyn and others. Also on display are Moorcraft ceramics, with tudric pewter stands and silver works based on Celtic designs by George Connell.

Opens: June 13
Closes: August 27


Drum

Peter Magubane
Political Football 1953 - 1956
black and white photograph
photograph copyright BAHA

Drum

Drum Durban Bureau
Beauty Queen 1950s
black and white photograph
photograph copyright BAHA

Drum

Ranjith Kally
Miriam Makeba with Sonny's Family 1959
black and white photograph
photograph copyright BAHA

Drum

Ranjith Kally
Pumpy 'Jazz King' Naidoo
black and white photograph
photograph copyright BAHA

Drum

Drum Durban Bureau
Football Supporters at Currie's Fountain 1950s
black and white photograph
photograph copyright BAHA
 


'The Indian in Drum in the 1950s' at the DAG

'The Indian in Drum in the 1950s' was conceived to restore the lived historical memory through striking images taken by some of the most outstanding photographers of the decade. It explores an unofficial Indian history in South Africa that confronts clichés of the homogenous Indian symbolised by the 'rich Indian shopkeeper', that was propagated by the apartheid régime to project a middle class 'non-European' society to missions abroad, with images of unemployment in Cato Manor and child labour on the sugar farms in Natal.

Photographs include that of Amaranee Naidoo, a shy Indian woman who rode a motorcycle on the 'Wall of Death', and Benny Singh, described as the 'father of non-European boxing' who is depicted in his Durban gym with prodigy Baby Batter whom he later promoted in Britain.

The exhibition articulates a broader, more intricate South African 'fifties culture that extends beyond the borders of effervescent Sophiatown. Victoria and Grey Streets, 'Durban's little Chicago', and the ghettoes of Cato Manor in Durban and Newclare in Johannesburg tell a different story. The story of Sheriff Khan for instance, described as South Africa's Al Capone of the 1950s, contests the dominance of Kort Boy and The Americans in Sophiatown. Further, it acknowledges the talent of photographers such as G.R. Naidoo, Ranjith Kally, Naransamy and Barney Desai who captured these images.

The rest of the exhibition expands on this rich past with cinema owners in Fordsburg, pin-up models, trapeze artists, the seine net fishing community, ballroom dancers and modern Indian women shaking off a more traditional past, evidence of a more tangible multi-faceted South African Indian history than has thus far been represented.

Opens: May 24
Closes: July 23

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