Archive: Issue No. 103, March 2006

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DURBAN

2.03.06 Bronwen Findlay at the KZNSA Gallery
2.03.06 Everett Duarte at the KZNSA Gallery
2.03.06 Bronwyn Lace at the KZNSA Gallery
2.03.06 'Amagugu VII - Treasures Exhibition' at the African Art Centre
2.03.06 'Absa L'Atelier art awards 2006' regional exhibition at artSPACE durban

3.02.06 Siphiwe Zulu at the KZNSA Gallery
3.02.06 Dumile Feni retrospective at the Durban Art Gallery
3.02.06 'Never Again' at the Durban Art Gallery
3.02.06 'Durban Today: eQuality of Life' at the Durban Art Gallery
3.02.06 Petros Ghebrehiwot at artSPACE Durban

13.01.06 Santu Mofokeng and Guy Tillim at the Durban Art Gallery
 

DURBAN

Bronwen Findlay

Bronwen Findlay
Blanket parts
Etching
76 x 112cm

Bronwen Findlay

Bronwen Findlay
Detail of source material
 


Bronwen Findlay at the KZNSA Gallery

Bronwen Findlay takes inspiration for her paintings here from patterns and designs on local fabrics, cloths and blankets. For Findlay, pattern, colour and texture have always been an important aspect of her work and a way in which she explores the origins of her source materials and the stories attached to these items. The items were sourced in various trading stores in Grey Street, Durban and in Diagonal Street, Johannesburg. Although the particular subject matter is important for Findlay as a starting point, it is the way in which she manipulates the materials that matter most.

Findlay is a well established painter and printmaker and was a merit prize winner in the 2004 Brett Kebble awards. She lives and works in Johannesburg and is currently a lecturer at the University of Johannesburg, Fine Art Department.

Opens: March 7
Closes: March 26


Everett Duarte

Everett Duarte
Isolation
Mixed media
2m x 1m

Everett Duarte

Everett Duarte
Expulsion
Mixed media
2m x 1m
 


Everett Duarte at the KZNSA Gallery

Tzaneen-born artist Everett Duarte was exposed to art at an early age by his father Izidro, who has a major influence in what he produces today. He moved to the South Coast to join his father in a new framing and painting business in 2003, an experience which led him to becoming a full-time artist in 2004.

His process of working is initially subconscious, sublimated emotive decisions that develop into an essence of place and time. The artist is technically concerned with the formal qualities of colour, pattern and texture that are explored in gestural movements of twists splatters and drags achieving vitality with the paint.

'Organic Structures' features the results of this process, often semi abstract paintings with strong brushmarks creating an illusion of depth, provoking an emotional response.

Opens: March 7,
Closes: March 26


Bronwyn Lace

Bronwyn Lace Detail of installation 2005
 


Bronwyn Lace at the KZNSA Gallery

The title of Bronwyn Lace's exhibition, '1.618' is the decimal representation of the 'golden ratio' - the irrational number which when applied to formal proportions, is deemed to have the most aesthetically pleasing qualities and which was well developed by the artists of the Renaissance. Working with the two dimensional schematic of this number, Lace will translate this into a complex three-dimensional environment, working with a physicist and engineer. The space will be 'built' using nylon monofilament, allowing the viewer to physically negotiate the conceptual underpinning of Western Beauty. The result will be ordered, but appear chaotic. The installation underpins Lace's interest in notions of beauty and the relationship between science and art.

Lace's tools are scale and space, creating environments into which a viewer will be absorbed. The process of her work is crucial. Her interest lies in the links between art and physics, both disciplines that use symbols to describe and explain the workings of the universe: the relationship between the artist's use of image and metaphor to the physicist's use of number and equation forms a basis for Lace's concepts.

Lace lives and works in Johannesburg where she obtained her BA(FA) from the University of Witwatersrand in 2004. She has participated in numerous group exhibitions over the past two years, including the 'Negotiate' series held at the Johannesburg Art Gallery in 2004. She also participated in 'Red Eye: Intersection' at Durban Art Gallery in October 2005.

Opens: March 7
Closes: March 26


Beadwork

Beadwork
Beads and buttons

Beadwork

Beadwork
Beads and buttons

Beadwork

Sweet tin
Tin, beads and wool

[Melmoth01.jpeg] Melmoth area
Imbenge
Beads, grass, beads
 


'Amagugu VII - Treasures Exhibition' at the African Art Centre

The 'Amagugu VII' exhibition stems from the 'African Dream' exhibition held at the African Art Centre in 1994, which featured artifacts including wooden Zulu headrests, pottery and beadwork. Numerous exhibitions have subsequently been held here, presenting collectors and art museums with the opportunity to purchase these valuable treasures. 'Amagugu VII' features a large collection of beadwork, wooden spoons, milkpails, headrests, imbenge and ceramics.

Beadwork items have been sourced from previously unexplored areas including from the Ngxamanga Group of the Eastern Cape and from Xhesimbe Group from the Mount Ayliff area in KwaZulu-Natal as well as pieces from the Fengu, Pedi, Pondo and Xhosa in the Eastern Cape. From the South Coast of KwaZulu-Natal, works from the Pondomisa, Umkomaas and Port Shepstone areas are represented. Beadwork from the Midlands area includes the Swayimani of New Hanover, the Valley of 1000 Hills, Msinga, Vryheid, Escourt, Bergville, Njasuthi and Pongola.

The exhibition will be opened by Senior Museologist, Yvonne Winters of the Campbell Collections, University of KwaZulu-Natal. Interested parties are invited to her lecture on the subject at 12pm, Saturday March 18.

Opens: March 15
Closes: March 25



'Absa L'Atelier art awards 2006' regional exhibition at artSPACE durban

artSPACE durban is the KZN collection point for artworks entered into this year's Absa L'Atelier awards' and will host an exhibition of entries from this region.

The competition is held annually for artists between the ages of 21 and 35. This award not only ensures South Africa's emerging artists of recognition, but also affords them the opportunity to develop their talents abroad. Eleven prizes are awarded, with the overall winner receives R100 000 in total from Absa, as well as a return air ticket to Paris, France. The prize money must be used for a time of study no more than six months in the studio apartment purchased for this purpose at the Cité Internationale des Arts. For more information see Exchange.

Opens: March
Closes: March 29


Simphiwe Zulu

Simphiwe Zulu

Simphiwe Zulu
 


Siphiwe Zulu at the KZNSA Gallery

Siphiwe Zulu's 'Confrontations' attempts to explore the notion of contemporary gender confrontation in his latest works. Zulu regards the elevation of women over men as sabotage to man's dignity. He believes that his paintings expose the practice of promoting women at the expense of men and he hopes to evoke some debate on this topic.

Zulu showed at the African Art Centre in 2000, at the KZNSA Gallery in 2002 and at the BAT Centre in 2003.

Opens: 6pm, February 14
Closes: March 5


Dumile Feni

Dumile Feni
Untitled
Black conté
76 x 56.5cm

Dumile Feni

Dumile Feni
Nina Series
Black ink on paper
75.8 x 56.2cm

Dumile Feni

Dumile Feni
Ruth First and Lilian Ngoyi
Colour lithograph
60.5 x 45.3cm

Dumile Feni

Dumile Feni
Father Teaches Me How to Pray, 1967
Conté
193 x 90cm

Dumile Feni

Dumile Feni
Old Woman, 1966
Terracotta
105cm

Dumile Feni

Dumile Feni
Railway Accident, 1960
Charcoal and conté on paper
102 x 237cm
 


'Dumile Feni: A Retrospective Exhibition' at the Durban Art Gallery

The death in exile of one of Africa's greatest contemporary artists was a blow to South African art. Dumile Feni, born May 21, 1942 left South Africa for exile in 1968, after the powerful statements made in his work resulted in harassment by the apartheid security forces. Feni contributed hugely to the African 20th century art world, and also to the struggle against apartheid. His works show anguished figures, often contorted as if in immense pain. The figures are clearly African as, according to the artist, 'My subjects are Africans because they are my people, but my message, the idea I am bringing to put across has nothing to do with racialism.'

Feni died in New York, in 1991, just before he was due to return home. He died in abject poverty and didn't live to see the dawning of a democratic South Africa.

He held several group and solo exhibitions. In 1966 he won a Merit Award on the SAB Art Prize Exhibition. In 1971, he was awarded first prize for a bronze sculpture in the art competition of the African Studio Centre in Los Angeles and in 1967 he represented South Africa at the São Paulo Biennale. Feni was commissioned to sculpt the first African Nobel Peace Prize winner and ANC president Albert Luthuli. In addition, he showed all over the world and worked with the United Nations to commemorate Namibia Freedom Day in 1983. Feni participated in the 'Voices from Exile' exhibition that toured the United States in the mid-80s. His work is to be found in all major South African art museums and individual collectors include President Thabo Mbeki. His work is also found in collections in the USA, the UK, Sweden and Israel.

Opens: February 15
Closes: March 26


Maria Criticos

Maria Criticos
Poster detail

Maria Criticos

Maria Criticos
Poster detail
 


'Never Again' at the Durban Art Gallery

'Never Again' celebrates the 30th anniversary of Diakonia, an organisation well known for its involvment in the struggle for human rights in South Africa.

Diakonia's inaugural meeting was held on March 25, 1975 when churches in Durban came together at a time of injustice and repression to form an agency that would help people of faith to speak out and act courageously as apartheid strengthened its grip. Since the birth of our new democracy, Diakonia has continued to speak out and work towards a more just society, where the rights and needs of all are both recognised and met.

In recognition of Diakonia's contribution to this struggle a print portfolio entitled 'Images of Human Rights', a collection of works by South African artists produced by the Artists for Human Rights, in 1996, to celebrate the nations new Bill of Rights, will be on show at the Durban Art Gallery. It will be augmented by work from the gallery's permanent collection by various photographers' work alongside sculptures by Dina Cormick, prints by Azaria Mbatha and posters by Maria Criticos.

The exhibition will be an artistic celebration of the principles upon which the new democracy was founded and will depict our artists' commitment to social documentary.

Opens: February 22
Closes: March 26


Joseph Manana

Joseph Manana
Learn to Ride
Acrylic on paper

Simphiwe Zulu

Simphiwe Zulu
Memories '03 Township
Acrylic on paper

Khlekani Dlamini

Khlekani Dlamini
Rural Area
Arcylic on paper
 


'Durban Today: eQuality of Life' at the Durban Art Gallery

The eThekwini Municipality is committed to improving quality of life. To this end, households in traditional dwellings, townships, informal settlements and in suburbs have been researched since 1998 in order to understand what a good quality life means to the residents of the Durban Metropolitan Area.

As a companion to the research, artists have been commissioned to visually demonstrate some of the findings and issues resulting from the research in an easily accessible and visual way. The artworks have been used to illustrate a comprehensive manual which presents the findings of research in an interesting and viewer-friendly manner. The Durban Art Gallery will host the exhibition of the original artworks in conjunction with the launch of the research findings manual.

Among the artworks commissioned include ceramic relief sculpture panels and puppet heads by Wendy Nel, cartoons and line illustrations by Dan Sheldon, line drawings by Sabelo Vilane, doorways by Doung Anwar Jahangeer, and photographs by Ben Haskins, Gisele Turner, Thomas Ferreira, Peter Bendheim, Prakash Bhikha and staff at iTrump.

Opens: February 22
Closes: March 19


Petros Ghebrehiwot

Petros Ghebrehiwot
Part of triptych
Acrylic on canvas
3 x 1.5m

Petros Ghebrehiwot

Petros Ghebrehiwot
Part of triptych
Acrylic on canvas
3 x 1.5m
 


Petros Ghebrehiwot at artSPACE durban

Petros Ghebrehiwot's 'Secrecy of Shelters' precedes the artist's Master's exhibition at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg. The main focus of his work is the internal and external spaces of shelters, especially the silent internal spaces, which contain many mysteries that people experience in their daily lives. In the works, Ghebrehiwot keeps these spaces dark and unexposed in order to suggest the mystery of both good and bad deeds that take place inside the shelters.

Also part of this exhibition are constructed ceramic sculptures based on architectural themes from imagination. These sculptures are models for many of his paintings. In them, there are features of present technological advancements mixed with antique characteristics. Some works for instance, incorporate biological structures such as viruses and DNA, as well as structures of spacecraft and planets. Viruses, besides their interesting structures, are parasites and cannot live without the host cell. This suggests that it is difficult to maintain life without shelters.

Petros Ghebrehiwot is an artist from Eritrea who currently resides in Pietermaritzburg.

Opens: 6.30pm, February 27
Closes: March 11


Santu Mofokeng

Santu Mofokeng
Baragwanuth, Soweto 2004
C-print
120 x 180cm

Santu Mofokeng

Santu Mofokeng
The Namib: Where did the road lead when it lead nowhere?
Namibia 1997
C-print
120 x 180cm

Guy Tillim

Guy Tillim
UN Helicopter lands at Buyatenge, a Mai Mai militia stronghold, bringing a Mai Mai general to negotiate the former Rwandan Hutu army's return to Rwanda, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, 2003
Digital pigment print
58 x 83.5cm

Guy Tillim

Guy Tillim
Farm fire, near Kroonstad, South Africa 2003
Digital pigment print
58 x 83.5cm
 


Guy Tillim and Santu Mofekeng at the Durban Art Gallery

Selected works from the 'Unsettled: 8 South African Photographers' exhibition curated by Mads Damsbo in conjunction with the Museum of Photography in the Royal Library, Copenhagen will be on view at the Durban Art Gallery until April 30. The exhibition was created in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the ending of apartheid in South Africa.

The works from the exhibition will be shown at Durban Art Gallery in two parts. The first, entitled 'Chapter One', features works by photographers Santu Mofokeng and Guy Tillim. 'Chapter Two', featuring works by David Goldblatt, Jodi Bieber, Nontsikelelo Veleko, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, will be on view from March to April 2006.

The images explore transformations in the new South Africa, from optimism and solidarity to the ever-present tensions, conflicts and challenges.

Opens: January 1
Closes: April 30

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