Archive: Issue No. 123, November 2007

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CAPE TOWN

04.11.07 Marlene Dumas at Iziko SANG
04.11.07 Moshekwa Langa at Goodman Gallery Cape
04.11.07 Gugulective at blank projects
04.11.07 Svea Josephy at Bell-Roberts
04.11.07 'Ball Sports' at AVA
04.11.07 'Africa South' at AVA
04.11.07 'Is there Still-life?' at the Old Town House
04.11.07 'Summer 07/08' at Michael Stevenson Gallery
04.11.07 Karlien de Villiers at Erdmann Contemporary
04.11.07 'Senior Undergraduate Visual Arts Students Exhibition' at art b.
09.11.07 Marlene Dumasat 34 Long
09.11.07 'Reveal' at 34 Long
04.11.07 Varenka Paschke at Worldart

07.10.07 Lisa Brice at Goodman Gallery Cape
07.10.07 Kevin Brand, Sanell Aggenbach and Julius Mfethe at AVA
07.10.07 Willem Boshoff at Michael Stevenson Gallery
07.10.07 Peter Eastman at whatiftheworld / Gallery
07.10.07 Nadja Daehnke at João Ferreira
07.10.07 Natasha Norman and Clare Sarembock at Bell-Roberts
07.10.07 Frauke Stegmann at CUBE
07.10.07 Philip Glazer at Irma Stern Gallery

04.09.07 Ernest Cole at Iziko SANG
06.05.07 'Art from Rorke's Drift' at Iziko SANG

04.03.07 'Fabrications' at Iziko SANG

SOMERSET WEST

07.10.07 'Greenhouse - From Painting To Plastic' at Bell-Roberts Lourensford

STELLENBOSCH & PAARL

04.11.07 'Graduate Exhibition' at Skone Kunste Gebou
04.11.07 Clare Menck at the US Art Gallery

07.10.07 Leora Farber at US Art Gallery

CAPE TOWN

Marlene Dumas

Marlene Dumas
Het kwaad is banaal (The banality of evil) 1984
oil on canvas
125 x 105cm


Marlene Dumas at Iziko SANG

'Marlene Dumas: Intimate Relations' is the first solo exhibition in South Africa by Marlene Dumas, one of the world's most renowned contemporary artists. The South African art community has been waiting for a comprehensive showcasing of Dumas' work since she rose to prominence on the international art stage. The exhibition and its related publication will cover a broad selection of her work, ranging from early conceptual pieces from her student years at Michaelis to very recent paintings and drawings dealing with contemporary global issues. The works, curated by Dumas herself and Emma Bedford, will be drawn from a variety of public and private collections in the Netherlands and Belgium.

Dumas chose 'Intimate Relations' for the exhibition's title as a way of framing the curatorial vision and selection of work to focus thinking around questions of what constitutes intimate relations between people, places and paintings. According to Bedford, Dumas' work 'deals with the cycle of life, and with issues of gender, sexuality, pleasure and pain, amongst others. While intellectual, ethical and moral questions stimulate and absorb her, it is her awareness of how these are experienced in and through the body that is central to her work.'

Dumas was born in Kuilsriver near Cape Town in 1953. After graduating from Michaelis School of Art, University of Cape Town, she left South Africa in 1976 to complete a post-graduate degree in visual art at the Atelier '63 in Haarlem. She now lives in Amsterdam.

Dumas has participated in many biennales and has twice been invited to show at Documenta in Germany. She represented The Netherlands at the Venice Biennale in 1995. Dumas has held solo exhibitions at prestigious venues in many centres of the world, such as the Tate, London (1996); the Centre Pompidou, Paris (2001); the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago (2003); and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo (2007).

Opens: November 8
Closes: January 13


 

Moshekwa Langa

Moshekwa Langa
I who have nothing 2007
mixed media on paper
106 x 78cm

Moshekwa Langa

Moshekwa Langa
Untitled VII 2007
mixed media on paper
140 x100cm

Moshekwa Langa

Moshekwa Langa
Untitled VIV 2007
mixed media on paper
77 x 57.5cm


Moshekwa Langa at Goodman Gallery Cape

This collection of Moshekwa Langa's new and recent work will be his first solo exhibition in Cape Town since his Fresh residency at the SANG. The work, often densely layered with a range of media and meanings, is characteristically both figurative and conceptual. Acute observations of human foibles and poignant evocations of memory, longing and loss reflect the frame of mind and experiences of an African artist and intellectual in Europe. Texts in speech bubbles and colour fields map complex social relationships and political histories with which the artist wrestles. Whether sourced from popular songs, literature or art history, lines of text, doodled in apparent abandon across drawings or collaged works, offer oblique, humorous or ironic commentary on contemporary life.

Born in Bakenberg in 1975, Langa has been resident in Amsterdam since 1997 when he was selected for the prestigious Rijksakademie programme. Recent solo shows include 'Moshekwa Langa' at MAXXI (Museo Nazionale delle arti del XXI Secolo), Rome, 2006 and 'Encounters: Moshekwa Langa - Homeland' at the Museum of Modern Art, Oxford, United Kingdom.

His work has also been included in a number of major international group exhibitions, including 'Snap Judgments: New Positions in Contemporary African Photography' curated by Okwui Enwezor, New York, 2006; 'Black President: The Art and Legacy of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti' at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, 2003 and the 50th Venice Biennale in 2003.

Opens: November 17
Closes: December 8


 

Gugulective

Gugulective


Gugulective at Blank Projects

Gugulective, which wowed audiences at 'Cape '07', is an artist collective made up of eight members. Although founded and developed in Gugulethu in 2006, artists from Langa and Khayelitsha have joined the group. Gugulective is born out of the need for creative projects in disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Conceiving of art as a means to promote development and create social cohesion within communities, they are nonetheless aware of the superceding concerns of crime and economic troubles that prevent the arts from receiving attention. Many township schools for instance do not teach art any longer, and extracurricular activities in this field are largely lacking, too.

Their latest group exhibition will work with the space at blank projects, creating a conversation between it and their Gugulethu-based exhibitions. They aim to interrogate the space whilst challenging the pre-conceived visual representation of shebeens in institutional and gallery spaces. In recent years the shebeen has been portrayed not only as a negative and loud space, covered with wallpaper and people sitting on beer crates, but as lacking aesthetics and recreational values. However, by bringing articles from the Kwa Mamli shebeen to blank projects, the Gugulective aims to upturn this association and also to symbolise the absence of not only black artists and audiences in gallery spaces, but also the fact that mobility structures hinder accessibility to institutional spaces and the city centre itself for individuals residing in Khayelitsha, Gugulethu and other outlying areas.

Opens: November 8, 6pm
Closes: November 30


 

Svea Josephy

Svea Josephy
Lavender Hill, South Africa
photograph

Svea Josephy

Svea Josephy
Lavender Hill, London, United Kingdom
photograph


Svea Josephy at Bell-Roberts

Barcelona, Delft, Sun City, Athlone: have we really thought about the ironies inherent in the way South Africa's suburbs and informal settlements have been christened? Svea Josephy has spent months photographing places that are identically named yet worlds apart, and the provocatively named 'Twin Town' exhibition at the Bell-Roberts gallery is the fruit of this labour. Focussing on the largely impoverished settlements surrounding Cape Town, Josephy traces a complex set of relationships - both differences and parallels - with places or events after which South African settlements are named. 'Twin Town' throws up unexpected trans-national connections and provides a fresh perspective from which to view the old issues of migrancy, forced removals and resettlement.

Josephy's explorations draw on euphemistic naming (Grassy Park, Lotus River, Ocean View and Lavender Hill), naming inspired by the colonial past (Delft, The Hague, Athlone and Stratford Green) as well as post-apartheid naming, so preoccupied with disaster (Tsunami, Kosovo, Rwanda, Harare, Vietnam, and Beirut).

Josephy is aware that in this country, the naming and renaming of land is a profoundly political as well as emotional act - naming is, after all, inextricably bound up with claiming. In some cases the one who names is the one who holds authority, power and mandate to name; in other cases, naming is playful and subversive - even, one might suspect, tongue-in-cheek (Beverley Hills? Bermuda Triangle? Hyde Park? Lost City? Lapland? Europe?). Included alongside the photographic pairings are texts, which elucidate the naming of the land. A publication which accompanies the exhibition provides more insight into the linguistic aspects of the project.

Svea Josephy is a lecturer at Michaelis School of Art, University of Cape Town.

Opens: November 14
Closes: December 22


 

Svea Josephy

Svea Josephy
Home and Away 2007
light jet print (colour photograph)

Louise Reardon

Louise Reardon
Blue Balls Series (Croquet Perve) 2007


'Ball Sports' at AVA

'Ball Sports', curated by Gallery Director Kirsty Cockerill, will employ all four gallery spaces. In the run up to the 2010 World Cup and in the wake of the Springboks' World Cup victory, all eyes are focused on sport. Art and sport are commonly perceived as polar opposites, drawing different audiences, engaging with different notions of culture. 'Ball Sports' will bring these two opposed spheres together, interrogating power at play.

Participating artists include Ralph Borland, Chris Diedericks, Doug Gimberg, Jackson Hlungwane, Svea Josephy, Marlise Keith, Andrew Lamprecht, Fritha Langerman, Lawrence Lemaoana, Jennifer Lovemore-Reed, Charles Maggs, Zanele Muholi, Louise Readon, Phillip Rikhotso, Vaughn Sadie, Robert Sloon, Ed Young and Dale Yudelman.

Opens: November 12
Closes: November 23


 


'Africa South' at AVA

'Africa South', curated by Mario Pissarro, creates a space to engage with evolving and overlapping geo-political identities, from the 'local' to the 'international'. The exhibition privileges the perspectives of artists residing in the southernmost part of the continent, including more recent migrations, both permanent and temporary. As a curated space 'Africa South' enacts broader questions of place: who has it; how has it been constructed; and how does it facilitate or impede mobility as individuals, 'communities', and as artists?

'Africa South' features both emerging and well known artists, including Omar Badsha, Peter E. Clarke, Garth Erasmus, Mambakwedza Mutasa and Donovan Ward, and is curated by Mario Pisarro for the Africa South Art Initiative (ASAI). Most works have been produced especially for the exhibition.

'Africa South' will be opened by Premesh Lalu, post-colonial studies scholar based at UWC. The curator will lead walkabouts every Saturday morning, from 11am.

Opens: November 26
Closes: December 14


 

Frans Oerder

Frans Oerder
Still Life
oil on canvas


'Is there Still-life?' at the Old Town House

After the Cubist revolution in art in 1907 and the proliferation of academic art schools, the genre of 'still life' painting, in South Africa as elsewhere, tended to lose the symbolic and moral meanings it had attained in 17th century Holland and 18th and 19th century France. It came to be associated primarily with the idea of representation. In a sense, still life now represents the idea of art itself, and artists in any medium are drawn to it to define themselves as artists. More recently, the very neutrality of the genre has presented opportunities for the introduction of new symbolic forms, especially from cultures that attach great significance to objects.

This exhibition, curated by Professor Michael Godby, combines examples of historical still life paintings from the Iziko Collections with a survey of South African still life painting, from its origins as an imitation of European practice to works from our own day. Stylistic trends that have been applied to the genre over the course of the 20th century are represented. Different methods that have been used to 'Africanize' still life are shown; highlighting works by a new generation of young artists who have appropriated the genre, not only to proclaim their identity as artists, but also to reinvest the subject with powerful new social meanings.

Opens: November 19
Closes: March 31


 

Doreen Southwood

Doreen Southwood
The Dancer (detail) 2007
bronze, steel, enamel paint, fabric
176 x 190 x 292cm


'Summer 07/08' at Michael Stevenson Gallery

Michael Stevenson's 12th annual summer exhibition promises once again to bring together new works from the gallery's artists, many of whom have enjoyed international exposure and critical acclaim in the past year. Photographic work came to prominence this year, with Berni Searle selected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York for its annual New Photography exhibition in September. Searle will show a new video work, Spirit of '76, commissioned by the Philagrafika initiative in Philadelphia, USA - a meditation on the ebb and flow of history, from the signing of the US Declaration of Independence in 1776 to the student uprisings in Soweto two centuries later.

This year the gallery expanded its horizons to include artists from beyond South Africa's borders and these artists (including Meschac Gaba and Youssef Nabil) will participate in the annual exhibition. The summer exhibition will also showcase new works by David Goldblatt and Guy Tillim, both of whom were included on Documenta 12 in June, and Pieter Hugo, this year's Standard Bank Young Artist for visual art who has solo shows scheduled in New York, Rome and Geneva. A new series of portraits of lesbian women by Zanele Muholi will be shown for the first time in South Africa; this series is also included in the prestigious Camera Austria 100th issue exhibition in Graz, Austria.

A major new four-figure bronze sculpture by Doreen Southwood entitled The Dancer will be seen for the first time on this summer exhibition. The exhibition will also include new sculptural installations by Wim Botha and Nicholas Hlobo. A large new painting by Deborah Poynton will be shown prior to her solo show in Berlin next April. The exhibition will also include new paintings by Mustafa Maluka who has just had a successful exhibition in Geneva and has a solo show in Berlin next year. New works by Conrad Botes and Anton Kannemeyer of Bitterkomix fame can also be seen. And, as always, a selection of quirky and irreverent ceramics by Hylton Nel will be on show.

Opens: November 28
Closes: January 12


 

<Karlien de Villiers

Karlien de Villiers


Karlien de Villiers at Erdmann Contemporary

The characters and creatures that inhabit the paintings, drawings and wooden cut-outs of this mixed media exhibition by graphic novelist Karlien de Villiers are all caught between conflicting emotions. The awkwardness of gender and sex intermingle with anxiety, desire, cruelty and a sense of longing and displacement to create complex phantasmagorical dreamscapes. Often playful whimsy seems to be at frivolous odds with something threatening and unheimlich lurking somewhere beneath the surface or behind the scenes. A palpable sense of doom meets colourful comic art and an off-beat sense of humour in an exhibition that takes you on a trip into the dark subconscious nooks and crannies of the post-feminist 21st century.

Opens: October 31
Closes: November 24


 


'Senior Undergraduate Visual Arts Students Exhibition' at art b.

Art b. is hosting this year's Unisa 'Senior Undergraduate Visual Arts Students Exhibition'. These exhibitions offer the opportunity to spot trends and upcoming talents. The hallmark of this exhibition, according to the organisers, is the diverse, yet well-researched work of these students. As students of a distance university, with only four practical workshops per year and where communications are literally by telephone, post or email, the quality time given at these workshops by the dedicated team of Unisa lecturers, is evident in the work of these students.

Students taking part in this exhibition are Inge Burman, Sean Cameron, Carol Norval, Carol Tasker, Elise Wessels, Jeff Dooley, Teresa Smith, Frieda Rabie and Carine Nepgen.

Opens: November 6
Closes: November 28


 

Marlene Dumas

Marlene Dumas

Untitled 1984
silkscreen and lithograph edition
45, 72cm x 41cm


Marlene Dumas at 34 Long

34Long Fine Art has included work by Marlene Dumas in group shows often during the last three years. This has not always been easy, as her work is much sought after; indeed, has risen in value to the extent that she is cited as the top-priced living female artist in the world today.


 
She is best known as a figurative painter. Her darkly tragic images are most often drawn from situations of brutal conflict, sexual excess or unspoken coercion. Painted in a terrible language of fierce brushwork, deeply expressive colour and burning anxiety, they combine beauty and devastation into images saturated in equal measure with human cruelty and human frailty.


 
Adding to the silently rising Dumas-fervour, sure to reach fever pitch in November, 34 Long has put together an exhibition of graphic works by the artist: a compact but compelling selection of works by Dumas, designed to complement the larger National Gallery exhibition.

Opens: November 6
Closes: December 1


 

Asha Zero

Asha Zero

'Shadow Pin Migration' ATM Bomb  2007

acrylic on board

40 x 30cm


'Reveal' at 34 Long

'Reveal' a group exhibition, shows a diverse range of contemporary works. Newly arrived works by Mr. brings in the 'J-pop' vibe. This term covers urban Japanese culture, in particular anima images derived from the hugely popular cartoon style of manga. Mr. started his career as an assistant in Takashi Murakami's KaiKai KiKi studios but has independently become a big name with his eye-catching images of pubescent boys and girls. Mr. confesses to being a 'lolicom': short for Lolita complex, a dark strain running through Japanese visual culture.

Highlights of the show will include newly released prints by Conrad Botes and William Kentridge. There will be some interesting recent works by Matthew Hindley, just back from Berlin.


 Opens: November 6
Closes: December 1


 

Varenka Paschke

Varenka Paschke
Beleka
oil and fabric on board
108 x 108cm


Varenka Paschke at Worldart

In this solo exhibition, Paschke assembles patchwork-like canvases from squares of different fabrics, painting these in oil. The end products vary considerably in many respects, but could be summed up as mainly figurative works in a contemporary idiom, sometimes entering into a dialogue with illustration work, and even taking on a partly digital character. In some cases, mosaic designs and floral patterns are integrated with figurative elements. Social commentary is often embedded in an array of decorative forms and shapes.

Since Paschke completed her studies at the Michaelis Art School in 2001, she has participated in various solo and group exhibitions in South Africa and abroad.

Opens: November 12
Closes: November 17


 

Lisa Brice

Lisa Brice
Chasing that High
gesso and emulsion on canvas
122 x 152cm


Lisa Brice at Goodman Gallery Cape

Known for the fearlessness of her wide-ranging subject matter that has included violence, crime and sexuality, as much as for the extraordinary diversity of materials and media she employs, Lisa Brice has recently returned to painting. In her first solo exhibition in Cape Town since 1999, Brice focuses on the first flush of love by drawing on photographic and film images that conjure memories of adolescent desire, love and teenage kicks. By formally including the universal teenage 'language' of bleached denim she adds a caustic lo-fi edge to these works that explore oppositional tensions and drives. The ambiguities of intense emotion, introspection and uncertainty are suggested through the urgent handling of gesso, emulsion, wash, ink and bleach.

Brice graduated from the Michaelis School of Fine Art at the UCT in 1990 and quickly established a stellar career with numerous local and international exhibitions before relocating to London in 1999.

On Thursday November 1 at 11am Brice will conduct a walkabout for the Friends of the South African National Gallery. Contact Lizzie O'Hanlon on (021) 467 4662.

Opens: October 20
Closes: November 10


 

Sanell Aggenbach

Sanell Aggenbach
Crossfire (Two Wrongs don't make a Right)

Julius Mfethe

Julius Mfethe
Young man on Horseback


Kevin Brand, Sanell Aggenbach and Julius Mfethe at AVA

In 'Arcadia' Kevin Brand and Sanell Aggenbach explore the implied pursuit of perfect happiness on two very different yet complementary levels. While Brand blurs the boundaries of the banal and the majestic through monumental suburban delights, Aggenbach addresses the friction between two opposing ideals, referencing Coleridge's mesmerising 'Kubla Khan'.

Brand locates his Arcadian vision within the confines of a suburban framework. His new works, in some instances, revisit ideas and extend concepts central to his lexicon of beauty within the banal. 'The pursuit of a perceived ideal has always intrigued me, be it a concept, place or object. The reduction of the imagery to a linear representation could be an indication that this quest for an Arcadian ideal is one that will sadly always be yearned for.'

In contrast to this vision, Aggenbach presents Crossfire (Two Wrongs don't make a Right) as an elegy addressing the cycle of violence and the perception that retribution deters wrongful actions. The focus of her installation falls on two opposing ideologies caught in an aftermath of hostility, which reduces two fantastical Utopian landscapes to a scene of havoc. Says Aggenbach: 'I use the parable of conflict in paradise to present a state of turmoil which comments on conflict, consequence and irrationality.'

In contrast to this vision of Arcadia, Julius Mfethe concentrates on an idealised vision of rural life, depicting the interactions between animals and people. Mfethe is a self-taught sculptor who began working as a full time artist in 1976. His wooden sculptures are characterised by an astute observation and meticulous attention to detail. The scenes and subjects, observed often with humour or reverence, translate the artist's sense of rural tradition life into wood. He is a master of his materials - indigenous woods Mbaba, Msimbiti and Mhlakothi are finely carved, capturing movement and muscle tone in his subjects in works that don't usually exceed 25cm in height.

In 1977 and 1997 Mfethe won first prize on the FNB Vita Crafts award and has had solo exhibitions at the Tatham Art Gallery, Pietermaritzburg, and at the African Art Centre in Durban.

Opens: October 22
Closes: November 9


 

Willem Boshoff

Willem Boshoff
Walking Stick Jig (detail) 2007
zebrawood, sapele mahogany
223 x 138cm


Willem Boshoff at Michael Stevenson Gallery

A conceptual artist of great stature, Willem Boshoff's work since the late 1970s has explored the interplay of art and language in the forms of concrete poetry, dictionaries, sculptures and installations. His previous show at the Michael Stevenson Gallery, 'Licked', took place in 2003. This exhibition, entitled 'Épat', sees Boshoff extending two seminal bodies of work, Blind Alphabet and KykAfrikaans, reflecting on the vital role that trees and wood play in his oeuvre, and commenting on world politics in characteristically playful yet pointed manner.

The artist writes: 'I am awestruck by trees and, to a large extent, dependent on them, not only for their great wooden material, but also for ideas.' Boshoff has spent the last few months working from the Nirox Art Residency, part of the Cradle of Humankind world heritage site near Krugersdorp. Here he found himself surrounded by spectacular trees in an area rich with myth.

Boshoff has exhibited extensively locally and internationally, and has represented South Africa at biennales in Johannesburg (1995), São Paulo (1996), Havana (2000) and Venice (2001). A retrospective exhibition of his work will be held at the Standard Bank Gallery in Johannesburg from September 25 to December 1, 2007.

Opens: October 25
Closes: November 24


 

Peter Eastman

Peter Eastman


Peter Eastman at Whatiftheworld / Gallery

Peter Eastman is best known for his emphasis on surface textures using high-gloss, reflective enamel paint. His range of cityscapes and figures formed the basis for his successful solo exhibition entitled 'Reflective' at Michael Stevenson Contemporary in 2004.

Eastman came to South Africa soon after he was born in 1976 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom. After a year at Michaelis School of Fine Art, he decided to make art on his own. He subsequently worked restoring antiquities in London before returning to Cape Town in 1998. He has had two small solo exhibitions and his work has also been included in numerous group shows. Eastman's work is included in numerous collections including the Hollard Collection, and he was selected as a finalist for both the Sasol New Signatures (2005) as well as the ABSA L'Atelier Award (2003).

Opens: November 2
Closes: December 1


 

Nadja Daehnke

Nadja Daehnke
Pest 2006
enamel paint, canvas on metal with graphite on wood framing
163 x 135cm


Nadja Daehnke at João Ferreira

Nadja Daehnke's latest solo exhibition considers the anguish, awe and desire of the human body. In a series of mixed-media paintings Daehnke reflects on the liminal state between the desirable and abject in relation to the interdependent strands of sexuality, illness and mortality. Her works reflect on the indigestible and incomprehensible inconvenience of the body failing - whether due to disease, ageing or the curtailment of desire.

This is Daehnke's fifth solo exhibition. A notable artist as well as a curator and critic, Daehnke has exhibited in the Netherlands, Germany, London and USA.

Opens: October 31
Closes: November 30


 

Natasha Norman

Natasha Norman

Clare Sarembock

Clare Sarembock


Natasha Norman and Clare Sarembock at Bell-Roberts

Natasha Norman's practise is concerned with symbolism: how society creates symols, how symbols communicate ideas to us and why some symbols have become heirlooms that are passed down through generations. Having previously worked exclusively with found photographs, Norman decided to engage with the medium of fashion photography for these two bodies of work entitled 'The Allure Series'. Comparing contemporary societal behaviour with its Renaissance predecessor, Norman has staged re-enactments of Renaissance paintings, shifting the medium and their content. Natasha Norman graduated from Michaelis School of Art, UCT with a BAFA in 2005. This is Norman's first exhibition with Bell-Roberts.

Claire Sarembock's work is photography-based, but she does not refer to herself as a photographer. Taking old found photographs of her family; the artist rephotographs and appropriates these. By doing so Sarembock recontextualizes the memories of childhood and portrays them as current fact. The images are printed on canvas and then sentences are embossed in white areas on the canvas in braille. The braille becomes a metaphor for fading memories - blind people don't see imagery - they hold imagery in their mind. Just as a memory becomes translucent, Sarembock has deliberately rephotographed these images so that they are not quite in focus (imperfect, as it were), as a reference to that faded memory which is her childhood.

Opens: October 17
Closes: November 10


 

Frauke Stegmann

Frauke Stegmann


Frauke Stegmann at CUBE

Graphic designer Frauke Stegmann's 'Domestic Desire' project is about making an inventory of everything she has acquired and kept as she moved around the world and after putting down roots in Cape Town a few years ago. The project focuses on her collection of domestic/homemaking objects sourced from various markets abroad and more from the Milnerton Market in Cape Town.

These objects, sourced initially as a way to try and recapture\re-live old memories have been adopted and have become the basis of a new collection of work, with the objects in the collection recreated to make 'new' things. The shape of each re-creation is predetermined by the autobiographical nature of the way the original pieces were acquired, but their origin is one of chance. Through the casting process required to make each object, the history of each is erased while the inherent memories each object carries are retained through the shape.

Peter Saville says of her work: 'She appreciates how the values and codes inherent in materials can be used to communicate effectively and with great economy. Her choice of "found" resources - transposed from original context and creatively repositioned - displays innovation with a remarkable and contemporary lightness of touch.' Stegmann will be included in 100@360 published by Laurence King/London as one of the world's top 100 up-and-coming graphic designers. The book is coming out at the end of 2007.

Opens: October 17
Closes: November 10


 


Philip Glazer at Irma Stern Museum

Photographer Philip Glazer shows at the Irma Stern Museum. Reflecting on his work, Glazer says: 'My introduction to photography began in 1958 when I was given a 5" x 4" Ricoh reflex camera. My passion for photography began with an in-depth look into the lives and characters of interesting people. In this diverse society, places and faces change with time and it is these images which I try to capture before it all disappears. Being there to capture a moment in time that can never be repeated can be exhilarating.'

Opens: October 31
Closes: November 17


 

Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole
At assignment desk, clerk's rubber stamp dictates mine where man will work, 1960-66

Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole
At the end of train ride comes a big squeeze as passengers must show their tickets before passing through narrow exit gates, 1960 - 66


Ernest Cole at Iziko SANG

Ernest Cole was a courageous young photographer who spent five years documenting everyday experiences of black South Africans under apartheid in the 1960s. Simply titled 'Ernest Cole', the exhibition is a commentary on many manifestations of apartheid, as seen through Cole's lens: the lives of migrant labourers recruited to the mines and the indignities that they were forced to endure, pass raids and arrests, the plight of domestic workers, 'Bantu' education, inadequate health care and poverty. The project culminated in the publication of House of Bondage in New York in 1967, negotiated by Magnum Photos, after Cole fled South Africa with a suitcase of his photographic prints.

The immediate banning of the book in South Africa imposed permanent exile on the photographer, who was then only 27. In the United States he undertook a project funded by the Ford Foundation, but this never reached completion and Cole finally gave up taking photographs. He died in New York in 1990, shortly before his 50th birthday and a few days after the release of Nelson Mandela.

Although the negatives for his South African images were smuggled out by fellow photographer Struan Robertson, with whom Ernest Cole had shared a darkroom in Johannesburg, their current whereabouts is unknown. In 2005, the Iziko South African National Gallery was granted funding by the National Lotteries Board to acquire a small collection of his photographic prints, possibly made in preparation for the re-publication of House of Bondage.

Opens: September 4
Closes: December 31


 

John Muafangejo

John Muafangejo
The Pregnant Maria
linocut


Art from Rorke's Drift at Iziko SANG

Curator Joe Dolby presents an important collection of art from Rorke's Drift. A seminal fine arts training centre for black artists during the apartheid era, Rorke's Drift in KwaZulu Natal afforded oppportunities for those denied art training in South Africa. Established in 1968, the school was initially managed by two Swedish art teachers, Peder and Ulla Gowenius.

The show also demonstrates the collecting policy of the National Gallery. The first prints and tapestries from Rorke's Drift in the collection of the Iziko South African National Gallery were acquired in the mid-1960s. Most of the artists represented were confined to well-known names such as Azaria Mbatha and John Muafangejo. In 2006, funding provided by the National Lottery Board enabled the gallery to significantly augment their holdings and to assemble a more representative selection detailing the diverse range of artistic production of the school.

Opens: May 16
Closes: June 24


 

Ulrich Apt the Elder

Ulrich Apt the Elder
The Crucifixion 16th century


'Fabrications' at Iziko SANG

'Fabrications', an ongoing exhibition drawing on the gallery's permanent collection, examines the ways in which artists have creatively used, painted or sculpted approximations of fabric and costume in their work, revealing surprising insights into social history as well as the artistic process.


 
 
SOMERSET WEST


'Greenhouse - From Painting To Plastic' at Bell-Roberts Lourensford

'Greenhouse - from Painting to Plastic' will coincide with the annual Cape Town Garden and Flower show to be held at the Estate between October 24 and 28. The exhibition is intended to explore the relationship between nature and art. This relationship dates back to the late 16th century when the cultivation of plants as items of beauty began. Botanical painting as an art-form soon followed.

The exhibition will feature work by 20 of South Africa's leading contemporary artists who are engaged in a wide range of practises from sculpture, painting, works on paper and ceramics to glass art. Participating artists include: Strydom van der Merwe, Lyndi Sales, Nick Bladen, Barbara Wildenboer; Leigh Voight, Jane Eppel, Pierre Fouché, Frederick Eksteen, Cara van der Westhuisen, Karen Strydom, Natalie Payne, Athol Moult, Anthony Strack, Diane Victor, Elmarie Constandius, Retief van Wyk, Lisa Firer, Christina Bryer, Katherine Glenday, Norman O'Flynn, Humzah Goolam and Clinton Friedman.

Opens: October 20
Closes: December 1


 
 
STELLENBOSCH & PAARL

Stellenbosch


'Graduate Exhibition' at Skone Kunste Gebou

Graduate students of the Stellenbosch University Visual Arts Department will be holding an exhibition of works from their final year. The exhibition will take an interdisciplinary approach and will showcase a diverse range of works from Jewellery Design, Visual Communication Design and Fine Arts. Held for the first time in the historic and recently renovated departmental building, 'Graduate Exhibition 2007' promises to showcase fresh talent. The catalogue and selected works will be on sale.

Opens: November 30
Closes: December 12


 

Leora Farber

Clare Menck
Camilla on her throne (detail) 2007
oil on board
35 x 38cm


Clare Menck at the US Art Gallery

The generally intimate and small easel paintings of Clare Menck are often characterised by their autobiographic content as she most frequently uses herself and those around her as her subjects. In her latest solo show 'Vignette', she focuses on figures in interiors evoking the Dutch and Northern European tradition of interior genre painting. The exhibition includes some striking female and male nudes in spaces familiar to the artist, but her popular swimmers and Karoo house-scapes will also feature.

'Vignette' marks Menck's return to Stellenbosch, a decade after the completion of her Master's degree in Fine Art at the University of Stellenbosch.

Opens: November 27
Closes: January 5


 

Leora Farber

Leora Farber
Aloerosa Induction (detail)


Leora Farber at the US Art Gallery

'Belonging' and 'displacement' are often contested terms in the language of post-colonial South Africa, where the severance of European ties is still being negotiated. In 'Dis-Location/Re-Location' Leora Farber explores these ambivalences through a dialogical relationship between South African colonial histories and lived present experience. Farber uses her image as metonym for herself and Bertha Guttmann - a Jewess brought to South Africa from Sheffield in 1885, in order to enter into an arranged marriage with the Lithuanian immigrant to South Africa, entrepreneur Sammy Marks. Residues of British and Jewish ancestry are visually and audibly grafted together with current influences from the Pan-African, post-colonial environment of Johannesburg. Ambivalences around belonging and displacement within this post-colonial environment are negotiated in relation to the artist's second-generation immigrant status.

In the work on exhibition, the amalgam of Bertha Marks and Farber is represented as engaged in needlework activities, considered as 'women's work' in the Victorian era and as a signifier of 'femininity' through docility and labour. The craft of needlework is used as a metaphor for the protagonist's attempts to negotiate a sense of being 'African' within a post-colonial environment by attempting to 'graft' a new identity physically and psychologically into herself.

This exhibition is travelling to seven art museums around the country and has been produced in collaboration with the South African design team Strangelove (Carlo Gibson and Ziemek Pater).

Opens: October 16
Closes: November 17


 
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