Archive: Issue No. 127, March 2008

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CAPE TOWN

2.03.08 Minnette Vári at Goodman Gallery Cape
2.03.08 Nicholas Hlobo at Michael Stevenson
2.03.08 'Upstairs/Downstairs' at AVA
2.03.08 Asha Zero at 34Long
2.03.08 Jeremy Purin at blank projects
2.03.08 Sharlene Khan, Michele Davidson and Justin Brett at AVA
2.03.08 Anton Karstel at João Ferreira
2.03.08 Jane Eppel at Bell-Roberts
4.03.08 Pamela Stretton at João Ferreira
4.03.08 Jeanne Hoffman at Whatiftheworld / Gallery
4.03.08 'Unyazi: fear of the known' at UCT and Stellenbosch
2.03.08 Dale Yudelman at the Photographer's Gallery
2.03.08 Rebecca Townsend at Irma Stern

10.02.08 Robert Hodgins at Bell-Roberts Lourensford
10.02.08 Andrew McIlleron at 34 Long
10.02.08 'Verf' at blank contemporary
10.02.08 'Karoo to City' at Rust-en-Vrede Gallery
10.02.08 Joe's Choice at AVA
10.02.08 Colleen Gericke and Selvin November at AVA

02.12.07 'Sasol Wax Art Awards Exhibition' at Iziko SANG
02.12.07 Willie Bester at Iziko SANG

04.11.07 'Is there Still-life?' at the Old Town House

DURBANVILLE

2.03.08 Theo Kleynhans, Gavin du Plessis and Restone Maambo at Rust-en-Vrede

FRANSHOEK

2.03.08 Mary Visser, Marieke Prinsloo and Nic Bladen at Grande Provence

PAARL

10.02.08 Andy Goldsworthy and Ouattara Watts at Glen Carlou

CAPE TOWN

Minette Vari

Minnette Vári
Fulcrum 2007
still from video


Minnette Vári at Goodman Gallery Cape

Johannesburg artist Minnette Vári is known for work that examines the discomfort and desires at the heart of personal, political and historical narratives, and the vigorous transformation of such knowledge, showing a constant interplay between the ancient and fantastical and the hypermodern and technological. The exhibition includes new multiple screen video projections and works on paper.

Since her last presentation in Cape Town in 2003, Vári has had a solo museum exhibition in Lucerne, Switzerland (2004), participated in several international group shows, made a second appearance on the Venice Biennale (2007) and has been invited to the 5th Seoul International Media Art Biennale in 2008.

Opens: March 8
Closes: April 5


 

Nicholas Hlobo

Nicholas Hlobo
Amaqanda'am 2007
performance sculpture with paper works in background


Nicholas Hlobo at Michael Stevenson

In Nicholas Hlobo's second solo exhibition at the Michael Stevenson, the focus will be on three different aspects of his artistic practice. One room will contain a range of what he refers to as drawings. These encompass his sketches on paper, wall-sized visual diaries, and works on paper using ribbon and rubber. A second room will be dedicated to standalone sculpture, continuing his exploration of space as seen in Umthubi, the large kraal exhibited on 'Izele', his first solo in 2006. A third room will showcase Hlobo's practice of using sculptures as performance props (and vice versa). He will stage a performance with musical accompaniment in the gallery space at the opening.

Since 'Izele', Hlobo has catapulted to international attention with solo exhibitions at Extraspazio, Rome; the Savannah College of Art and Design in Savannah, Georgia; and the Aardklop festival in Potchefstroom. Until 24 February 2008, his work can be seen on 'BoysCraft' at the Haifa Museum of Art, Israel. Hlobo also has work on 'Impossible Monsters' at ArtExtra, Johannesburg, until January 24. He is one of the artists selected for 'Flow', a survey show of young African art at the Studio Museum in Harlem, opening April 2008, and in July 2008 he will present a new solo project at the ICA Boston as part of their Momentum series.

Opens: March 6
Closes: April 19


 

Justin Brett

Justin Brett
Apartments (detail)
plaster of Paris


'Upstairs/Downstairs' at AVA

'Upstairs/Downstairs' curated by Bettina Malcomess interacts directly with the AVA gallery space as it negotiates the problem of 'place'. Says Malcomess: 'Contemporary art and life are defined by a constant sense of flux, but also a global connectedness, albeit sometimes virtual. We are obsessed with the idea of space as giving the co-ordinates of the self. We are at all times insiders and outsiders, besides ourselves, stuck in the middle, lower or higher class, out of step, somewhere else, in two places at once, up, down and lost.'

Participating artists include Jake Aikman, Justin Brett, Dan Halter, Renée Holleman, Dorothee Kreutzfeldt, The Gugulective, Charles Maggs, Nandipha Mntambo, Moataz Nasr, Christian Nerf and Douglas Gimberg, Dave Southwood, Margeret Stone, Athi Patra-Ruga and the infamous Ed Young.

Opens: March 31
Closes: April 18


 

Asha Zero

Asha Zero
zansi nib 2008
acrylic on board
80 x 70cm


Asha Zero at 34Long

34 Long hosts the first Cape Town solo show of paintings by Asha Zero, a young South African artist whose work is now entering the international art circuit. In a fresh, hyper-contemporary take on urban culture, Asha Zero produces obsessively worked metaphors for a world of dissolved, disappearing and reappearing stimuli. Dead-pan and provocative, his acrylic on board works are at the same time aggressive and vulnerable, desirable and repulsive. His sense of absurdity is razor-sharp, complex and idiosyncratic.

Reminiscent of Berlin Dadaist Hannah Hoch's collaged imagery, Richard Hamilton's cynicism and the solemn wit of Banksy, Asha's odd fragments and combinations function within a global and historical frame of reference as much as it remains rooted in the present-day sidewalks of South Africa. His many disparate allusions are kept in balance by compelling technical mastery and the gravitas of devoted manual labour – the images are entirely hand-painted.

Opens: March 11
Closes: April 12


 

Jeremy Purin

Jeremy Purin


Jeremy Purén at blank projects

A recent graduate from Stellenbosch University, Jeremy Purén is an energetic protagonist, eager to shake up the staid conceptualism reigning in the art world. Fabian Saptouw describes this resident prankster's graduate exhibition as 'not focussed on defining a visual aesthetic, but rather the manifestation of an artistic attitude'. Something which was demonstrated most ably by one video piece where Purén filled up his petrol tank and proceeded to drive his kombi up and down Victoria Street until his car eventually ran out of petrol - an event that only took place over 13 hours later.

At blank projects he will show an evolving installation, creating an interactive environment that the gallerists hope will not destroy the space...

Opens: March 5
Closes: April 4


 

Sharlene Khan

Sharlene Khan
B (lack)
mixed media


Sharlene Khan, Michele Davidson and 'Provoke' at AVA

The provocative Sharlene Khan exhibits (B)lack in the Main Gallery at the AVA. Large mixed media works interrogate the words and terms used to describe the street trade in South African city centres. Khan deconstructs these terms hoping that the viewer will become aware of how words can perpetuate existing racial and xenophobic stereotypes. Khan completed a Masters in Fine Art at the University of Durban-Westville and a second Masters degree in Fine Arts at the university of the Witwatersrand.

Michele Davidson exhibits 'Personally Public' in the Long Gallery. Davidson uses public and private ablutions as a palette of irony. 'I have used my usual painting style to romanticise an often grim space. Light and shadow play a very important role in 'sugar coating' a space where people clean themselves. In the feature work Don’t forget to brush your teeth one is seduced by the subtle, atmospheric light on the basin, but the basin is cluttered with toothbrushes, and mouthwash in the background, suggesting that someone has just recently brushed there teeth and spat in the basin!'

'Provoke' is a group show that employs the Artsstrip and New Media room. 'Provoke', curated by Nico Eilers and Vivien Kohler, present works by seven artists: Robyn Cedras, Dion Cupido, Alessandra Desole, Nico Eilers, Vivien Kohler, Sophie Peters, Janet Ranson and Kennett Sinclair. The aforementioned artists work in the collaborative space of GoodHopeArt Studios, as individuals their mediums and conceptual parameters are different but they come together in 'Provoke' to interrogate social orders, concerns and behaviour.

Opens: March 18
Closes: March 28


 

Anton Karstel

Anton Karstel
Untitled 2007
oil on canvas
63 x 42 cm


Anton Karstel at João Ferreira

For his seventh solo exhibition Anton Karstel presents a series of paintings. He explains the logic behind the exhibition: 'The paintings in 'Kerkraad NG Gemeente Lyttelton-Oos' are part of a series that draws on a stash of old books and photographs which I dug up in my family home in a suburb near Pretoria. For the portrait series I used a group photograph that was taken in 1988. I homed in on their faces, distilling a glance from each member.'

Karstel's thickly layered oil on canvas paintings are part of the following corporate collections; Department Visual Arts and Art History, University of Pretoria, Development Bank of Southern Africa, Gencor, The South African National Gallery, The Pretoria Art Museum, Pretoria Technicon, Sasol, Vodacom.

Opens: March 5
Closes: March 29


 

Jane Eppel

Jane Eppel
Sanctum I 2007
oil & prayer flag on canvas
40 x 60 cm

Jane Eppel

Jane Eppel
Blessings for 2007

oil & prayer flags on canvas
60 x 80 cm


Jane Eppel at Bell-Roberts

In her second solo show Eppel explores notions of homecoming and of hallowed space. With photographic precision and the finest of brushes, she renders images of personal iconography. The painting of these works is a meditative process within which she finds containment and sanctuary. Tiny figures float in ambiguous spaces in paintings at once familiar and nostalgic. 'Sanctum' depicts a search for a sense of refuge and location in anxious times.

Jane Eppel graduated from the Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town in 2001.

Opens: March 5
Closes: March 29


 

Pamela Stretton

Pamela Stretton
Fed Up 2006
digital inkjet print on foam
120 x 120 cm


Pamela Stretton at João Ferreira

Pamela Stretton's works predominantly with the female body, focusing on issues such as beauty ideals and the body's relationship with popular culture, fashion, health and food. Stretton's laborious modus operandi echoes the obsessive and painstaking control exerted on the female body by the ideals inculcated in society. Inspired by print, most of her work takes the form of digital inkjet prints, usually combining photographic images and text. The use of square formats, grids and pixels are used to highlight the notion of conformity, aided by the tight cropping of close up images of the body. Soft padding subtly invokes feminine curves, as well as giving organic dimension to what would otherwise be flat prints.

Since graduating in 2002, Pamela Stretton has been a finalist in Spier Contemporary 2007, Absa Atelier 2003, 2006 and 2007, Brett Kebble Art Awards 2005 and winner of Sanlam Vuleka 2005. Stretton's work is represented in the following collections; Katrine Harries Print Cabinet (Michaelis school of Fine Art), Hollard Insurance and UNISA.

Opens: April 2
Closes: April 26


 

Jeanne Hoffman

Jeanne Hoffman
Floorplan (detail) 2008
ink on paper
dimensions variable


Jeanne Hoffman at Whatiftheworld / Gallery

In 'Strange things travel with you' Hoffman shows drawings made during recent residencies in Belgium and Finland and a large scale installation based on these drawings.

Hoffman explains her working method: 'The drawings in this exhibition move between layers of intuition, thought and language, and alternate between the double horizon of absence/presence, speaking/silence and space/place. These themes draw together my conception that drawing is above all an approach: a way of thinking.

When I work I conceive of every gesture as a drawing in a space, whether on paper, or by combining and shaping materials the concern remains the same: I am drawing. The way objects and fragments are set up in a space is similar to setting up relationships between individual lines and traces in a drawing. Each object functions as a drawing within the drawing, like constellations within constellations of material.'

Opens: March 5
Closes: March 29


 

James Webb

James Webb


'Unyazi: fear of the known' at UCT and Stellenbosch

Including the likes of Willem Boshoff, Stacy Hardy, Righard Kapp and the curator himself, James Webb, 'Unyazi: fear of the known' looks set to live up to its byline of 'extreme listening'. Apart from these local sound heroes, Webb has enticed French, Australian and German maestros to the party.

The festival will be hosted at the University of Cape Town on March 12, the University of Stellenbosch on March 14 and 15, and will move up country to the University of the Witwatersrand on March 16. There will be a number of concerts and conferences associated with the festival.

Opens: March 12


 

Dale Yudelman

Dale Yudelman
Edward 2007
chromogenic colour print
43 x 82 cm


Dale Yudelman at the Photographer's Gallery

Johannesburg born photographer Dale Yudelman's career has led him through two eras of South African history and across several continents. Yudelman's photographs from his critically acclaimed ongoing series Reality Bytes have been featured in numerous shows in South Africa, Europe and the USA. But for this show at the Photographer's Gallery, Yudelman shows a body of work that pursues a more personal account of the individuals who apply for work on public notice boards.

These community-advertising spaces are found in busy convenience stores and supermarkets across South Africa, where they seldom receive a second glance from most consumers. Many of the applicants are from Malawi or Zimbabwe; each note bears its own temperament from the wording to the character of the handwriting and once placed in the foreground of our immediate and unhurried experience, the petitions become a personal passage to the emotions of the writer seeking employment.

The photographs alongside each handwritten note, act as a connector, serving to animate the history, the immediate reality, as well as the plight of these immigrants - bringing meaning and context to our sense of country and belonging.

Opens: March 5
Closes: April 5


 

Rebecca Townsend

Rebecca Townsend


Rebecca Townsend at Irma Stern

'Art does not reproduce what we see; rather, it makes us see,' says Paul Klee. Based on this statement, Rebecca Townsend has taken familiar objects and cast them in glass. Her intention is to address the lack of attention with which we consume and discard things. And in this way we are encouraged to reconsider the manner in which we treat the world. Glass is a material that has been seen as precious for centuries. It is delicate and fragile, yet infinitely resistant to the elements. Its weight and history encourages us to treat it with care.

The central floor installation is comprised of panels made of black bags cut along the lines of latitude and longitude that form a selected part of the Southern Hemisphere. On top of this base are placed transparent fused glass gems to represent the shapes of Africa and South America. These are purposely not stuck down; if someone chooses to take one, so be it.

There will be a walkabout with the artist on Saturday March 8 at 11am.

Opens: March 5
Closes: March 29


 

Robert Hodgins

Robert Hodgins
General Alheit 2007
wheel-thrown and assembled earthware
250 x 400mm


Robert Hodgins at Bell-Roberts Lourensford

Robert Hodgins has exhibited extensively in Europe and the South Africa and the work of this octogenarian can be found in private and public collections both locally and internationally. However this is only the second exhibition of ceramic works by Hodgins in 18 years, making this exhibition almost a retrospective of his works made between 1989 and 2007.

The exhibition will be accompanied by an extensive coffee table book documenting Hodgins' ceramic work, researched and written by Retief van Wyk and published by Bell-Roberts Publishing. Special limited editions, including an original artwork and signed by the artist, will also be available.

Opens: February 9
Closes: March 31


 


Andrew McIlleron at 34Long

Shack fires are a direct result of the migration of rural people to the cities, usually in search of a better life for their families. Migrants often have little option but to live in high-density shanty towns with minimal or no public services - fertile ground for accidents.

This body of photographic work by Andrew McIlleron centres around a blaze which took place in Joe Slovo informal setlement in May 2006. Joe Slovo is approximately 8km from central Cape Town and is home to some of South Africa's poorest people. There had been a fire on the adjacent piece of land the previous year. Fire victims were moved to a temporary housing project in Delft while new houses were constructed on the site where the shacks had been razed by flames. This is the new N2 Gateway Development. The new flats are occupied, however, not by the victims of the fire as promised by the authorities.

The exhibition does not attempt to deal with political arguments around government's responsibilities to its poorest citizens. Rather, it is a visual poem about lives caught up in promises made and not kept.

Opens: February 12
Closes: March 15


 

Marna Hattingh

Marna Hattingh
Verf (detail)


'Verf' at blank contemporary

'Verf' is a group show by five young artists working in painting and mixed media. Participating are Marna Hattingh, Christo Basson, Hannes Bernard, Katrin Coetzer and Alex Emsley.

Opens: February 13
Closes: March 30


 

Jonathan Deal

Jonathan Deal
Karoo


'Karoo to City' at Rust-en-Vrede Gallery

'Karoo to City' shows the work of Jonathan Deal and Cooper. Their richly textured images which include traditional Karoo landscapes, abstract cityscapes and vintage cars are exhibited in mixed media, from archival prints on fibre paper to block-mounted canvases.

Opens: February 12
Closes: March 6


 


Joe's Choice at AVA

This exhibition of specially selected work, entitled 'Joe's Choice', brings together the experienced, discerning eye of long-established art dealer, artist and collector, Joe Wolpe, with the artistic vision of Cape Town artist, Jill Trappler. It showcases a tight selection of works, in a variety of media from acrylic on canvas to etchings, made by Trappler over the last three decades. It is borne out of a studio showing by Trappler in July 2007 and Wolpe's abiding, strong interest in her extensive oeuvre.

For this show, Wolpe, himself an artist with a dedicated following, has made a strict choice of quality works sourced from Trappler's prodigious output. Wolpe's only criterion for inclusion is the standard and quality of the works themselves. Hence this exhibition does not conform to current curatorial paradigms and has neither a definite theme or subject, nor any chronological restrictions.

Trappler is well-known artist who has pursued her changing vision by exploring many modes of non-representation in her art. Trained at the Johannesburg Art Foundation (founded by her late uncle, Bill Ainslie), Trappler has relentlessly followed her creative impulse, producing primarily non-figurative acrylic pieces which examine her relationship with colour, scale, structure, shape, surface and texture, the last three being clearly of dominant interest. A weaver by training, she sometimes threads her canvas into shaped configurations not often found in more traditional painting practice.

Her work is represented in major corporate and public art collections which include SANG, Vodacom, SABC, Boland Bank and UCT. She continues to participate in art workshops and conferences, both local and international, and is currently working on a book about Bill Ainslie.

Opens: February 18
Closes: March 7


 

Colleen Gericke

Colleen Gericke
Neologism (detail) 2007

Selvin November

Selvin November
Duidelik 2007
mixed media


Colleen Gericke and Selvin November at AVA

The first solo exhibition by Colleen Gericke, 'Neologism', interrogates a term used in linguistics that refers to the act of creating a new word or attaching a new meaning to an existing word. Says Gericke: 'We are all acquainted with the language of a plastic fork in a takeaway container, clingwrap covering a head of lettuce, red soda through multicoloured straws, a frayed pot-scourer in murky Sunlight water, plastic curlers in hair. I am inspired by the intimate familiarity of this language. I follow the vital principle that one should view all things as if for the first time; to view what is considered ordinary and mundane as uncommon and extraordinary. I therefore try to temporarily obscure the viewer's fixed memory of the everyday, to make room for free imagination, associations, fantasy, childhood memories and a touch of mystery. I use installation art to organise and distort household objects e.g. straws and pot scourers in such a way that their everyday function becomes misplaced.'

Selvin November shows 'The Portrait Speaks' on the Artsstrip. November interrogates portraiture, the way a subject is presented and how through this presentation the artist presents and exposes themselves. November negotiates notions of strength and beauty in the subject and explores, through this, memory and identity. The large mixed media works distort the traditional surface/skin associated with oil on canvas.

This is November's third solo exhibition at the AVA. He has participated in many group and curated exhibitions since 1989, including 'Upfront and Personal' at the Iziko SANG in 2004 and 'Who are they really' at XCape in 2007.

Opens: February 18
Closes: March 7


 

Walter Oltmann

Walter Oltmann
Unearthing (detail) 2007
cast metal installation


'Sasol Wax Art Award 2007' at Iziko SANG

The prestigious Sasol Wax Art Award is aimed at established, professional artists who are required to use this material as part of their process, medium or concept for their works. The award for 2007 went to Walter Oltmann for a metal cast installation, using the lost wax method. Choosing to title his work Unearthing, Oltmann observes that this 'underpins the notion of uncovering or bringing to light by digging, searching or discovery. It reflects the post-Apartheid era impulse to uncover our history. The hands with dowsing tools suggest practices associated with finding water and settlements as much as digging and mining; as a means of survival, as well as exploiting the land for its riches and also denying access and agency to others.'

The 2007 Sasol Wax Art Award exhibition also includes the work of finalists Wayne Barker, Usha Seejarim, Andrew Verster and Sue Williamson. Barker's investigations into the activities of bees have led to an installation that is, 'a discovery of the possibility of healing with nature and ultimately, the whole of society'. Sue Williamson's split screen video explores the secret world of waxing behind the beauty parlour door. A recreation of a bedroom and a bathroom in fragile wax paper, by Usha Seejarim, suggests a dream-like world and, our own transience as human beings, while Andrew Verster explores ritual and body markings in his powerful installation of suspended panels constructed from layers of tissue paper held together by wax.

Opens: December 5
Closes: March 9


 

Willie Bester

Willie Bester
The Missing Ones


Willie Bester at Iziko SANG

Bester's capacity to work with found and rejected objects and scraps of metal, and to transform them into extraordinary sculptures filled with social and political meaning, has gained for him a national and international reputation. Added to this is his individualistic application of the medium of oil paint. His source of inspiration is his own environment and experience, but he succeeds in speaking to a bigger audience and in making his ideas and intentions universally applicable.

The exhibition comprises sculptures and paintings and offers a glimpse into Bester's early paintings of the 1980s, which have seldom been seen in public. Of particular interest is the series of portrait studies, specially created for the show and on permanent loan to the Montagu Museum. This exhibition offers the public a rare opportunity of seeing the evolution of Bester's work from its early beginnings through to the recent paintings and sculptures.

This exhibition is the result of collaboration between the Iziko South African National Gallery and the town of Montagu in the Western Cape, where Bester grew up. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue with contributions from Professor Michael Godby and Professor Sandra Klopper.

Opens: December 5
Closes: April 13


 

Frans Oerder

Frans Oerder
Still Life
oil on canvas


'Is there Still-life?' at the Old Town House

After the Cubist revolution in art in 1907 and the proliferation of academic art schools, the genre of 'still life' painting, in South Africa as elsewhere, tended to lose the symbolic and moral meanings it had attained in 17th century Holland and 18th and 19th century France. It came to be associated primarily with the idea of representation. In a sense, still life now represents the idea of art itself, and artists in any medium are drawn to it to define themselves as artists. More recently, the very neutrality of the genre has presented opportunities for the introduction of new symbolic forms, especially from cultures that attach great significance to objects.

This exhibition, curated by Professor Michael Godby, combines examples of historical still life paintings from the Iziko Collections with a survey of South African still life painting, from its origins as an imitation of European practice to works from our own day. Stylistic trends that have been applied to the genre over the course of the 20th century are represented. Different methods that have been used to 'Africanize' still life are shown; highlighting works by a new generation of young artists who have appropriated the genre, not only to proclaim their identity as artists, but also to reinvest the subject with powerful new social meanings.

Opens: November 19
Closes: March 31


 
 
DURBANVILLE

Restone Maambo

Restone Maambo
The scenes behind


Theo Kleynhans, Gavin du Plessis and Restone Maambo at Rust-en-Vrede

Rust-en-Vrede will be showing the work of three artists concurrently. Theo Kleynhans has put together a series of 'illuminations' made whilst reading Arthur Rimbaud's book of prose poetry. Kleynhans explains: 'A fragment of painting, a cerebral doodle that tries to capture the evanescent emotion I felt during the reading, accompanies the embroidery. In choosing to embroider cement I hope to create an illumination or a eureka moment for the viewer. The embroidered and painted images are loosely associative but invite re-interpretation. These images drift from the concrete to the ephemeral in the same meandering pattern as the poetry.'

Gavin du Plessis continues his interest in the teachings of Carl Jung, revisiting Jung's work on symbolism and archetypal phenomena. By invoking the archetype, du Plessis hopes to arrive at a synthesis of personal and collective psychic processes. For du Plessis, archetypes are the key to unlocking timeless universal patterns, and motifs stemming from the collective unconscious.

Emerging artist Restone Maambo will be exhibiting 'The Scenes Behind' concurrently.

Opens: March 11
Closes: April 3


 
 
FRANSCHHOEK


Mary Visser, Marieke Prinsloo and Nic Bladen at Grande Provence

This will be Mary Visser's first show in Franschoek after exhibiting in many well known galleries in Cape Town and Johannesburg. Visser's emotional response to the landscape is clearly visible in her work. Scenes in acrylic and oils of places in and around Cape Town - often harbour views, serve as inspiration for her landscape painting.

Nic Bladen scours the veld to find interesting non-endangered fynbos plants. On site at the back of his bakkie he casts the entire plant, roots, stem, leaves and flowers. These are then worked into magnificent – realistic silver sculptures in his studio. Most of his work is mounted on crystal block mounts. He is also known for his delicate fine silver fynbos jewellery.

Multi-award winning Overberg artist Marieke Prinsloo will be exhibiting a new series of work comprising life size sculptures made from a cement fondue. Her work will be on show both inside and outside in the sculpture garden at Grand Provence.

Opens: March 16
Closes: April 16


 
 
PAARL

Ouattara Watts and Andy Goldsworthy

Ouattara Watts and Andy Goldsworthy
installation view

Ouattara Watts

Ouattara Watts
Creation of the world 2002
mixed media on canvas, photography, wood, copper
280 x 400 cm


Andy Goldsworthy and Ouattara Watts at Glen Carlou

Land artist Andy Goldsworthy has travelled to South Africa to oversee the installation of three of his pieces into the collection of the Swiss magnate Donald Hess, owner of Paarl winery Glen Carlou. Goldsworthy is a world famous environmental sculptor who explores and experiments with various natural materials such as leaves, stones, wood, sand, clay, ice and snow. The seasons and weather determine the materials and the subject matter of his projects. With no preconceived ideas of what he will create, he relies on what nature gives him. One piece Hard Earth was originally created by plastering the inside of a room with white clay which as it dried and cracked began to take on a vastly differently aspect. Hard Earth and other Goldsworthy pieces in the Hess collection will be going on show.

Alongside Goldsworthy, a key diasporan artist, Ouattara Watts, will also be showing work at Glen Carlou. Watts has been featured in a number of blockbuster shows including Okwui Enwenzor's 'The Short Century', 'Documenta' in 2000, the Whitney biennale and the Venice biennale. On display will be 11 of his paintings and watercolours from 1992 until 2006.

Opens: January 29


 
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